Career and Technical Education

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Career and Technical Education
Aerospace ScienceAS020SAS021SAerospace Science 1
Aviation History & Foundations of Citizenship: This course emphasizes civilian and military contributions to aviation; the development, modernization, and transformation of the Air Force; and a brief astronomical and space exploration history. It covers/reinforces basic history, organization, mission, traditions, goals, and objectives of JROTC for all services as well as key military customs and courtesies, how to project a positive attitude, and the principles of ethical and moral behavior. It provides strategies for effective notetaking and study skills for academic success and also covers how to be emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy, along with a section on “Unlocking Your Potential." Military Drill and Ceremony is taught and practiced in this class. One day a week is designated for wellness which embraces the President’s Challenge exercise activities designed to motivate cadets to lead active, healthy lifestyles.
This course is open to all grade levels and new students to the program; however, the course content is designed for incoming freshman.
Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education1
3
Career and Technical Education
Aerospace ScienceAS022SAS023SAerospace Science 2
Science of Flight & Survival Skills/Communication, Awareness & Leadership: This introductory course focuses on how airplanes fly, how weather conditions affect flight, flight and the human body, and flight navigation. This course also provides training in skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to successfully perform fundamental tasks needed for survival presenting “good to know” information that would be useful in any survival situation. Students are taught about communicating effectively, understanding groups and teams, preparing for leadership, solving conflicts and problems, and personal development. Military Drill and Ceremony is taught and practiced in this class. One day a week is designated for “Wellness”; with exercise activities designed to motivate students to lead active, healthy lifestyles.
Students may enroll at the semester.

This course is open to 9th-12th grade students. However, the course content is primarily designed for second year high school students.
Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education2
4
Career and Technical Education
Aerospace ScienceAS024SAS025SAerospace Science 3
The aerospace science portion of the course provides students with the latest information on exploring space and an introduction to cybersecurity and technology. This course incorporates an understanding of the solar system in the overall expanse of the universe. Space hazards, physical demands of space flight, orbits/trajectories, rocket design and launch are also studied. The leadership education curriculum is designed to prepare students for life after high school in the high-tech, globally oriented, and diverse workplace of the 21st century. Students will learn how to become a more confident financial planner and to save, invest, and spend money wisely, as well as how to avoid the credit trap. They will learn about real-life issues such as understanding contracts, leases, warranties, legal notices, personal bills, practical and money-saving strategies for grocery shopping, apartment selection, and life with roommates. Military drill and ceremony and proper uniform wear is taught and practiced in this class. One day a week is designated for “Wellness”; with exercise activities designed to create habits for students to lead active, healthy lifestyles.
None
Students may enroll at the semester.

This course is open to 9th-12th grade students.
Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
9, 10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education3
5
Career and Technical Education
Aerospace ScienceAS026SAS027SAerospace Science 4
Cultural Studies/Fundamentals of Management & Management of the Cadet Corps - This course introduces students to the world’s cultures through the study of world affairs, regional studies, and cultural awareness. This course also addresses fundamentals of management from a leadership role to include management techniques, decision making within an organization, time management, and interpersonal skills of delegating, negotiating, and mentoring. It also emphasizes student management of the AFJROTC program similar to a student council. Cadets assigned to key leadership roles will plan and direct unit activities such as community service projects, award and promotion programs, fitness and wellness events and social activities. Military Drill and Ceremony is taught and practiced in this class. One day a week is designated for “Wellness”; with exercise activities designed to motivate students to lead active, healthy lifestyles.
Students may enroll at the semester.

Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education4
6
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS045SBusiness Essentials
This course is a practical presentation of basic business principles. Students will explore all aspects of the business world including marketing, management, finance, economics, legal considerations, ethics and social responsibility, possible careers and technology used. Workplace communication and leadership skills will be taught throughout the class. This course will also serve as a preview to all other courses offered in the business department.
Assess personal skills, abilities, and aptitudes and personal strengths and weaknesses as they relate to career exploration and development.
Relate the importance of lifelong learning to career success.
Utilize information and technology tools to conduct business effectively and efficiently.
Apply interpersonal skills to communicate in a clear, complete, concise, correct, and courteous manner on personal and professional levels.
Analyze the relationships between contract law, law of sales, and consumer law.
Analyze the role and importance of agency law and employment law as they relate to the conduct of business in the national and international marketplaces.
Apply the role of the law, ethics and social responsibility in business decision making.
Analyze the organization of a business.
Analyze the management functions and their implementation and integration within the business environment.
Distinguish human resource functions and their importance to an organization's successful operation.
Analyze financial data influenced by internal and external factors in order to make short-term and long-term decisions.
Recognize the customer-oriented nature of marketing and analyze the impact of marketing activities on the individual, business, and society.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education1
7
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS012SComputer Applications for Business
Think you know it all? You will be surprised how much you don't know about computer applications! Expand the skills you need to be successful in high school and beyond. The demand for individuals to use computer hardware and software to create documents, gather information, and solve problems will continue to grow. This course is designed to help students master skills in the areas of word processing, spreadsheet applications, presentation applications, Internet usage, and integrated software applications.
This course may be available for articulated credit. See the Computer Applications for Business teacher for details.
Demonstrate improvement in speed and accuracy of keyboarding.
Identify proper ergonomic principles.
Demonstrate proper keyboarding technique.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditIS 119Word Processing
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
2
8
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS030SCreating Career Success
You're hired! Do you know what it takes to launch your career? This course will help you develop the qualities and skills necessary for success in the workplace. Students enhance their technology skills as they develop competencies needed by professionals in a variety of fields. In addition, this course develops employability skills such as communication, problem-solving, interviewing, presentation and more that is important to college and career success!
Investigate personal attributes, standards, goals, interests, and aptitudes as they relate to career.
Analyze various careers by looking at salary, benefits, job requirements, educational requirements, employment outlook.
Complete a job application, cover letter, and resume.
Demonstrate proper interviewing techniques, including appropriate professional appearance, business etiquette, and communication skills.
Demonstrate proper workplace skills when completing assignments and activities.
Apply concepts of time management, including use of electronic calendar and project management tools Investigate life-long learning through continuing education and membership in professional organizations
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Career and Technical Education3
9
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS025SPersonal Finance and Business
Come and explore practical financial skills necessary to survive in the world after high school.Understanding and managing personal finances are key to your future financial success.Students will learn how choices influence occupational options and future earning potential.Students will also apply decision-making skills to evaluate career choices and set personal goals.This course is designed to help the learner make wise spending, saving, and credit decisions and to make effective use of income to achieve financial success.
This course fulfills the Personal Finance graduation requirement.
Compare gross and net income.
Explain the purpose of standard deductions such as income taxes, social security (FICA), Medicare, deductions for health care and retirement savings plans.
Explain the purpose of Income taxes such as earned and unearned income.
Distinguish other taxes that consumers pay such as property tax, excise tax, and sales tax.
Explain how taxes provide public goods and services.
Analyze the personal financial risks that can occur when unexpected events damage health, home, property, wealth or future opportunities.
Explain how and why insurance companies create policies and determine premiums.
Analyze factors people use to choose insurance coverage.
Explain how personal behavior and risk impact insurance premiums.
Analyze health insurance options to provide funds in the event of illness and/or to pay for the cost of preventive care.
Develop a savings plan, which Identifies short, medium and long-term savings goals including saving for high value purchases, postsecondary education/training and retirement.
Compare the services, service fees, and requirements of various financial institutions such as banks, savings and loans, credit unions, and virtual banks.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Career and Technical Education4
10
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS013SMultimedia Communications
Unleash your creativity while learning to use multimedia functions in the changing world of business.The demand for multimedia knowledge and the ability to apply it will continue to expand as businesses employ multimedia applications.Develop and expand your digital side utilizing desktop publishing, graphics, audio, video, and electronic presentation skills.Students will incorporate these advanced computer applications into a large variety of business and personal projects.
Determine appropriate hardware and software required for specific multimedia tasks.
Identify and determine effective use of design principles.
Evaluate the purposes, functions and features of software and hardware utilized in desktop publishing.
Identify and determine effective use of design principles.
Demonstrate the process of planning a document.
Create marketing materials using desktop publishing software.
Create and manipulate digital images from a variety of sources using photography- based editing software.
Create animations using animation software frame-by-frame and tweening techniques.
Create video files using video editing software.
Export video for a variety of media outlets.
Analyze career/self-employment and certification opportunities in Multimedia.
Create a multimedia project for a specific demographic and client.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education5
11
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS034SGraphic Media Communications
Students develop proficiency in using the latest graphic arts anddesktop publishing software to create a variety of business publications suchas flyers, brochures, newsletters, etc.This area of instruction provides content for employment in career areaswhich include graphic arts and publishing skills.Demand in this area will continue to expandas businesses utilize advanced graphic arts skills to increase their productionefficiency and improve the creativity and quality of business documents andpublications.Products created in thiscourse could be included in a professional portfolio.
Successful completion of Business Launch 8th Grade.
Evaluate the purposes, functions and features of software and hardware utilized in desktop publishing.
Demonstrate design concepts.
Evaluate the purposes, functions and features of photography and image editing software.
Utilize the functions and features of photography and image editing software.
Utilize the functions and features of photography and image editing software.
Develop and demonstrate desktop publishing software skills.
Demonstrate typography concepts.
Develop a portfolio.
Manipulate digital images from a variety of sources using photography- based software to enhance publications.
Identify career opportunities in Desktop publishing fields.
Prepare a budget for a Publication.
Create a presentation that caters towards a specific demographic and client.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education6
12
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS042SWeb Design and Communication
Have fun designing web pages!This course introduces students to web page design techniques.Topics include customer expectations, multimedia technologies, usability and accessibility practices, and techniques for the evaluation of web design.Upon completion, students should be able to employ advanced design techniques to create high-impact and highly functional web pages.
Successfully completedMultimedia Communications or Digital Information Technology in 8th Grade with a grade ofB or higher
Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the Internet and the tools used to access information.
Differentiate among platforms and browsers in relationship to the Web.
Access and appropriately utilize Web-based resources.
Evaluate Web sites based on design elements and principles.
Select and develop content for sites based on purpose target audience using research techniques.
Create flow charts, storyboards, wireframes, and technologies.
Plan an organized layout.
Apply web page introductory principles.
Demonstrate image creation and manipulation skills.
Create Web Page using Web authoring software.
Demonstrate ethical behaviors when creating web pages.
Describe various Web publishing techniques.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education7
13
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS010SSports & Entertainment Management
Sport and entertainment fans, this is your chance to be a part of the game on a whole new level! A fast growing field in business today is sports and entertainment management. This course covers the topics of professional, college, and amateur sports, the entertainment industry, and event planning. Learn about management, finances, marketing, facility operations, and legal/ethical issues in these highly popular industries. Whether it's in the front office or behind the scenes, sports and entertainment management is a slam dunk for you.
Successful completion ofPersonal Finance and Business and Computer Applications for Business isrecommended.
Analyze management concepts as they pertain to the sports and entertainment industries.
Identify management responsibilities as they pertain to the sports and entertainment industries.
Analyze the impact target market on business decision making.
Analyze marketing concepts as they pertain to the sports and entertainment industries.
Describe the relationship between supply and demand as they pertain to the sports and entertainment industries.
Analyze the current economic environment and its effect on business.
Analyze the impact of the sports and entertainment industry on the economy.
Analyze how marketing research impacts price, product, and promotional decision.
Define price and the role it has on determining profit.
Analyze the impact target market on business decision making.
Analyze Promotional strategies.
Describe brand identity, brand marks and trademarks.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education8
14
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS001SBS002SAccounting
This course will introduce students to basic accounting concepts and allow students to explore accounting and related career opportunities. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of accounting procedures and techniques utilized in solving business problems and making financial decisions for various types of business ownerships.
Successful completion ofPersonal Finance and Business and Computer Applications for Business isrecommended.
Know and demonstrate accounting concepts as they apply to business operations.
Know and demonstrate the steps in completing the accounting cycle process.
Know and utilize computerized accounting systems.
Know and utilize computerized accounting systems.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditACC 100Applied Accounting
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
9
15
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBMA001SBMA002SBusiness Management Processes
This course is one part of the combined AMPED (Algebra in Manufacturing, Production, Entrepreneurship and Design) course. This Career and Technical Education (CTE) course engages students by integrating entrepreneurship skills with the math skills they are learning in their Algebra 1 course in an authentic, real-world setting. Students will solve real-world, career-centered problems as they run an advanced fabrication lab customizing textile products. The proceeds generated from the business aspect of the program will be utilized to self-fund the venture and provide philanthropic opportunities for students through community service or monetary gifts to local charities. This contextual learning experience combines business entrepreneurship and all Algebra 1 standards through relevant and interactive, career-centered projects. Students will be enrolled in two courses and receive both an Algebra 1 and a CTE credit.
Completion of Math 8 or equivalent.
Students must be concurrently enrolled in MMA003S/MMA004S Algebra 1 AMPED --Algebra, Manufacturing, Production, Entrepreneurship and Design.
Apply interpersonal skills to communicate in a clear, complete, concise, correct, and courteous manner on personal and professional levels.
Communicate clearly and express creatively for a variety of purposes using the platforms, tools, styles, formats and media appropriate to their goals.
Collaborate with others to broaden perspectives and enrich learning
Compare and contrast the effectiveness of communication methods in business
Explain leadership skills that a successful entrepreneur would exhibit
Apply the role of the law, ethics and social responsibility in business decision making.
Apply the Engineering Design Cycle.
Formulate a plan for utilizing profit in a business.
Compare and contrast pricing policies for an entrepreneurial venture.
Research requirements for retention of accounting records and business documents.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education10
16
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS008SBusiness Management and Entrepreneurship
Run your own business and make money while earning CTE credit! Students will get the exciting opportunity to develop a product, create a business plan, operate a business, and sell a product for profit.All students can benefit from an understanding of and appreciation for entrepreneurship and its role in the enterprise system.Come behind the scenes of business operations and learn entrepreneurship, human resources, financial management, communications, and marketing while operating a fully functioning business.
Successful completion ofPersonal Finance and Business.
Computer Applications for Business is recommended.
Know fundamental business concepts that affect business decision making.
Know and demonstrate the concept of risk management in business.
Know and demonstrate the use of basic financial concepts pertaining to income statements in making business decisions.
Know and demonstrate the concepts and processes for marketing-information management.
Use 21st Century tools and technology to maintain, evaluate, and share information for business decision-making.
Know and demonstrate the concepts and processes in the procurement, production, and distribution operations of a company.
Know and demonstrate the use of basic financial concepts pertaining to balance sheets in making business decisions.
Know and demonstrate the use of basic financial ratios used in making business decisions.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education11
17
Career and Technical Education
Business EducationBS047SEntrepreneur Accelerator
Entrepreneur Accelerator teaches students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and design thinking skills. Learn how to bring a product or service innovation to a market. Craft a business model to successfully launch your new business.
Successful completion ofBusiness Management and Entrepreneurship.
Communicate clearly and express creatively for a variety of purposes using the platforms, tools, styles, formats and media appropriate to their goals.
Collaborate with others to broaden perspectives and enrich learning.
Compare and contrast the effectiveness of communication methods in business.
Explain leadership skills that a successful entrepreneur would exhibit.
Evaluate the accuracy, perspective, credibility and relevance of information, media, data, or other resources
Implement the design thinking process to problem solve.
Evaluate the various ways in which government affects specific businesses.
Research business plan resources and information.
Explain ways entrepreneurs can protect themselves from risks.
Use research tools to identify consumers’ needs and want
Design procedures and strategies for reaching potential audiences for business ventures
Analyze the importance of the information in the business plan to different stakeholders
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education12
18
Career and Technical Education
Business InternshipBI001SBusiness Internship/Cooperative Career Education (CCE)
In the Business Internship/CCE curriculum, students can earn high school credit by taking the CCE class and working at paid internship positions.The curriculum reflects current business trends and prepares students to meet the demands of the business world.Topics covered in the class include marketing, employment, career preparation, communication skills, entrepreneurship, and business ethics and etiquette. The Business Internship/CCE student schedule will vary to meet individual employment and academic needs.Students have the flexibility to work during the school day, evenings or weekends in order to earn credit for employment.Students typically take four to five classes, one of which is the CCE class.A dual enrollment course can substitute for one of the classes.
Approval of instructor, completion of application,andsenior status is required. Students must have a 2.0 GPA to apply for CCE.
For 10-19 hours per week, please use code BI001/BI002. For 20 hours or more per week, please use code BI003/BI004.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education
19
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO020SFundamentals of App and Game Development
Fundamentals of App and Game Development is for the beginning programming student.Programming skills will be taught through Mobile App and Game development. Students will learn basic programming concepts such as if-statements, loops, variables and operators.Topics include game design with VB.NET and Mobile App development with App Inventor.
Use predefined functions and parameters, classes and methods to divide a complex problem into simpler parts.
Describe a software development process used to solve software problems (e.g., design, coding, testing, verification).
Describe how various types of data have an impact on memory in a computer system.
Explain how sequence, selection, iteration, and recursion are building blocks of algorithms.
Describe how mathematical and statistical functions, sets, and logic are used in computation.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education1
20
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO015SIntroduction to Programming
Introduction to Programming is aimed at students with little or no programming experience and is designed to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. In this introductory course, students learn and practice essential computer science concepts using the Java programming language. This course equips student with logical thinking and problem-solving skills that are transferable and applicable to a variety of disciplines.
Completion of Algebra 1 with a grade of "A" or "B"is highly recommended.
Interpret the flow of execution of algorithms and predict their outcomes.
Create variables that represent different types of data and manipulate their values.
Design algorithms using sequence, selection, and iteration.
Decompose a problem by creating new data types, functions, or classes.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education2
21
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO010SCO011SAP Computer ScienceYesYes
The major emphasis in the AP Computer Science course is on programming methodology and algorithms in the Java programming language. Students will spend an extensive amount of time coding, debugging, and running their own object-oriented programs. A student with no prior experience in programming who is capable of working at Honors level may enter this course. Introduction to Programming is strongly recommended as a prerequisite. This course will prepare the student for the Advanced Placement "A" exam in Computer Science.
Introduction to Programming, Fundamentals of App and Game Development OR Algebra 2 is strongly recommended.
Students in 9th Grade may enroll with department leader approval.
Decompose a problem by defining new functions and classes.
Use various debugging and testing methods to ensure program correctness (e.g, test cases, unit testing, white box, black box, integration testing).
Describe ethical, security and privacy issues that relate to computer software and networks.
Explain how sequence, selection, iteration, and recursion are building blocks of algorithms.
Describe how mathematical and statistical functions, sets, and logic are used in computation.
Work in a team to design and develop a software artifact.
Describe how various types of data have an impact on memory in a computer system.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesAP3
22
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO012SCO013SComputer Programming C++Yes
The major emphasis in the WG C++ Programming Language course is on programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures in the C++ Programming Language.Key concepts will include: logic, loops, data types and structures, file I/O (input/output), classes, methods, functions, pointers, and recursion.Class projects will include console and/or visual programs.A student with no prior experience in programming who is capable of working at the honors level may enter this course.
Successful completion of Introduction to Java Programming, Fundamentals of App and Game Development, or Algebra 2 strongly recommended.

Design algorithms using sequence, selection, and iteration.
Demonstrate code reuse by creating programming solutions using libraries and APIs.
Deconstruct a complex problem into simpler parts using predefined constructs.
Decompose a problem by creating new data types, functions, or classes.
Demonstrate the value of abstraction for managing problem complexity.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education4
23
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO018SWebsite Programming and Development
In Website Programming and Development, students will create, publish and maintain dynamic websites by writing source code. Topics will include HTML, CSS, databases and server-side scripting. This is a good course to follow Business Web Design and Communication. A student with no prior experience in programming who is capable of working at the honors level may enter this course.
Any one of the following: Fundamentals of App & Game Development or, Introduction to Programming, or AP Computer Science, or Computer Programming C++.
Students in 9th grade may enroll with department leader approval.
Describe a software development process used to solve software problems.
Create and organize web pages through the use of a variety of web programming design tools.
Use Application Program Interfaces (APIs) and libraries to facilitate programming solutions.
Apply analysis, design, and implementation techniques to solve problems.
Deploy principles of security by implementing encryption and authentication strategies.
Deploy various data collection techniques for different types of problems.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education5
24
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO005SComputer Networking Essentials
In this course students will gain a basic understanding of computer networking through hands-on experience and instruction.Students will learn and use appropriate terminology, plan, implement and maintain a network.Topics include cabling, wireless connectivity, network topology, protocols, and server administration.Students will be working in the Microsoft Windows Server environment.
Explain networking protocols and their hierarchical relationship hardware and software. Compare protocol models and select appropriate protocols for a particular design.
Apply analysis, design, and implementation techniques to solve problems.
Work in a team to design and develop a functional network for a given scenario.
Explain the principles of security by examining encryption, cryptography, and authentication techniques.
Explain how data is sent over a network.
Describe how the Internet facilitates global communication.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education6
25
Career and Technical Education
Computer ScienceCO030STechnical Support and Service
Technical support is essential in any organization.Through this experiential learning course, students will gain technical support experience and enhance their technical support skills while assisting Rockwood Technology Support staff with the following tasks: student Chromebook support and repair, projector lamp replacement, computer setup, connectivity issues, and O/S issues.In addition to these hands-on experiences, students will prepare to obtain A+ certification, an industry standard certification through CompTIA.
Use a systematic process to identify the source of a problem within individual and connected devices.
Explain the role of operating systems (e.g., how programs are stored in memory, how data is organized/retrieved, how processes are managed and multi-tasked).
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education7
26
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC052SFood Fundamentals
Food Fundamentals is an introductory food exploration course that incorporates food preparation, meal planning and nutrition.
This course is a prerequisite for concepts taught in Baking and Pastry and Regional and World Cuisine.
Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
Create original works as a means of personal or group expression through the presentation of food.
Plan strategies to guide inquiry in a foods lab setting.
Identify and utilize kitchen utensils in a professional manner.
Efficiently plan and manage lab responsibilities.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education1
27
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC054SBaking and Pastry Arts
In Baking and Pastry Arts, students will build upon the beginning baking skills learned in Food Fundamentals. Scientific principles and plating techniques will be explored during the production of cakes, cookies, pastries, breads, and other confections. This course can serve as a prerequisite for the Culinary class.
Successful completion of Food Fundamentals
Identify and select ingredients for use in a variety of baked products.
Describe and apply the function of ingredients in the baking process.
Describe and use the equipment typical to the baking process.
Prepare a variety of products using different techniques.
Understand and apply the basic baking science principles, ratio and technique.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education2
28
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC055SRegional and World Cuisine
Regional and World Cuisine is an applied product-based course in which students will utilize previously acquired knowledge of food principles and preparation in the exploration of challenging new concepts.Emphasis in regional and international cuisine is placed on discovering and implementation of worldwide food preparation items.This course will also prepare students for continued education or employment in the food service industry.
Successful completion of Food Fundamentals.
Apply cooking methods used in different cultures.
Identify typical ingredients used in each region.
Explain the relationship between geography and the culinary arts of a region.
Demonstrate the use of specific equipment used in regional, national, or international cuisine.
Demonstrate continued development of effective and sound work practices, including knife skills, personal and kitchen organization's skills.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education3
29
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC023SCulinary Arts 1
Culinary Arts 1is the first course in the ProStart Program, a two-semester based curriculum program that prepares high school students for careers in the restaurant and food service industry. Students gain valuable restaurant and food service skills through their academic and workplace experiences. Each point along this path is one step closer to achieving a successful rewarding career in the industry.
Successful completion of Food Fundamentals and either Baking and Pastry or Regional and World Cuisine.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated Credit
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
4
30
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC028SCulinary Arts 2
Culinary Arts 2 is the second course in the ProStart Program, a two-semester based curriculum program that prepares high school students for careers in the restaurant and food service industry.Students gain valuable restaurant and food service skills through their academic and workplace experiences.Each point along this path is one step closer to achieving a successful rewarding career in the industry.
Successful completion of Culinary Arts 1.

Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated Credit
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
5
31
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC053SFood Science
Food science is the study of producing, processing, preparing, evaluating, and using food.Research in food science leads to new discoveries every day. Students in this course will have an opportunity to explore the field science and discover related careers.Students will actively participate in experiments related to the fundamentals of chemistry and nutrition.
Analyze factors that contribute to foodborne illness.
Demonstrate practices and procedures that assure personal and workplace health and hygiene.
Prepare food for presentation and assessment.
Conduct sensory evaluations of food products.
Explain the properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures in foods and food products.
Analyze the effects of thermodynamics on chemical reactions in foods and food products.
Explain the impact of molecular structure of simple and complex carbohydrates on digestion, nutrition, and food preparation procedures.
Explain the process of ionization in the formation of acids and bases and effect on food and food products.
Explain the impact of molecular structure of simple and complex carbohydrates on digestion, nutrition, and food preparation procedures.
Relate the composition of lipids and proteins to their functions in foods and their impact on food preparation and nutrition.
Explain the value of molds and enzymes in food products.
Analyze the effects of food science and technology on meeting nutritional needs.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education6
32
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC056SFashion Fundamentals 1
Fashion Fundamentals1 involves students in critical thinking through fashion, consumer awareness, basic sewing techniques, career exploration, clothing care and maintenance. The skills developed through project based learning can be utilized for practical purposes and applied to many careers.
Suggested follow-up courses: Fashion Fundamentals 2 or Fashion Design and Merchandising.
Explain the ways in which fiber, fabric, texture, pattern, and finish can affect visual appearance.
Apply basic and complex color schemes and color theory to develop and enhance visual effects.
Apply time management, organizational, and process skills to prioritize tasks and achieve goals.
Demonstrate appropriate procedures for care and disposal or recycling of textile products, considering diverse needs locally and globally.
Evaluate quality of textiles, fashion, and apparel construction and fit.
Demonstrate professional skills in using traditional and technologically innovative equipment, tools, and supplies in textiles, fashion, and apparel construction, alteration, repair, and recycling.
Use appropriate industry products and materials for cleaning, pressing, and finishing textiles, fashion, and apparel.
Demonstrate basic skills for production, alteration, repair and recycling of textiles, fashion, and apparel.
Apply appropriate terminology for identifying, comparing, and analyzing the most common generic textile fibers and fabrics.
Evaluate performance characteristics of textile fiber and fabrics.
Demonstrate appropriate procedures for care and disposal or recycling of textile products, considering diverse needs locally and globally.
Explain the ways in which fiber, fabric, texture, pattern, and finish can affect visual appearance.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education7
33
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC057SFashion Fundamentals 2
Fashion Fundamentals2 is designed for the student who has a strong interest in fashion construction or textiles. Students will study textiles, pattern selection, fashion related careers and sew using advanced construction techniques.The skills developed through project based learning can be utilized for practical purposes and applied to many careers.
Passing grade in Fashion Fundamentals 1
Suggested follow-up course: Creative Fashion or Fashion Design and Merchandising.
Analyze state and federal policies and laws providing consumer protection.
Evaluate performance characteristics of textile fiber and fabrics.
Evaluate quality of textiles, fashion, and apparel construction and fit.
Explain the ways in which fiber, fabric, texture, pattern, and finish can affect visual appearance.
Explain production processes for creating fibers, yarns, woven and knit fabrics, and non-woven textile products.
Demonstrate basic skills for production, alteration, repair and recycling of textiles, fashion, and apparel
Demonstrate employability skills, work ethics, and professionalism.
Apply time management, organizational, and process skills to prioritize tasks and achieve goals.
Evaluate quality of textiles, fashion, and apparel construction and fit.
Utilize elements and principles of design in designing, constructing, and/or altering textiles, fashion, and apparel.
se appropriate industry products and materials for cleaning, pressing, and finishing textiles, fashion, and apparel.
Demonstrate basic skills for production, alteration, repair and recycling of textiles, fashion, and apparel.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education8
34
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC058SAdvanced Creative Fashion
Advanced Creative Fashion is the culmination of the Fashion Fundamental courses.Students will learn progressive construction techniques, pattern drafting, and textile design using state of the art technology. A summary of education and training requirements and opportunities for career paths in textiles, fashion, and apparel industries is included as part of this course. Suggested follow-up course: Fashion Design and Merchandising.
Successful completion of Fashion Fundamentals 1 and Fashion Fundamentals 2.
This class may be taken more than once with instructor approval.
Understand textile design and how it is used creatively in the textile industry.
Learn pattern drafting skills essential for fabricating original designs.
Recognize quality construction is essential for identifying high standard products and apparel.
Gain exposure to career opportunities in the apparel industry.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education9
35
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC025SFashion Design and Merchandising
Fashion Design students will learn the dynamics of the fashion industry including a study of designers and historical clothing, design and apparel production, and careers and merchandising trends. Students will develop an original fashion project through design inspiration and sketches. Individual projects related to fashion design, construction, and marketing are completed.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education10
36
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC011SChild Development 1
Child Development 1 prepares students to examine issues that surround parenting. Topics of study include: responsibilities of parenthood, financial considerations, the reproductive process, sexually transmitted diseases, family planning, birth defects, pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum experiences. Students will also learn about the child’s growth and development during newborn and infancy stages.
This course may be eligible for articulated college credit. See the Child Development 1 teacher for details.
Analyze strategies that promote growth and development of children, youth and adults.
Analyze child development theories and their implications for educational and childcare practices.
Analyze principles of human growth and development across the lifespan.
Analyze roles and responsibilities of parenting.
Analyze the effects of family as a system on individuals and society.
Evaluate parenting practices that maximize human growth and development.
Analyze biological processes related to prenatal development, birth, and health of child and mother.
Analyze physical and emotional factors related to beginning the parenting process.
Analyze social, emotional, and environmental factors of prenatal development and birth in relation to the health of parents and child.
Analyze conditions that influence human growth and development.
Analyze principles of human growth and development across the lifespan.
Analyze career paths within early childhood, education & related services.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditCFD 101
Foundation of Child and Family Development
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
11
37
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC012SChild Development 2
Child Development 2prepares students to examine issues that surround parenting. Topics of study include: responsibilities of parenthood, financial considerations, the reproductive process, sexually transmitted diseases, family planning, birth defects, pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum experiences. Students will also learn about the child’s growth and development during newborn and infancy stages.
Successful completion of Child Development 1 and teacher approval via application.
This course may be available for articulated college credit. See the Child Development 2 teacher for details.
Analyze child development theories and their implications for educational and childcare practices.
Analyze principles of human growth and development across the lifespan.
Analyze conditions that influence human growth and development.
Explore assessment tools and methods to observe and interpret children's growth and development and apply to assess growth and development across the lifespan.
Demonstrate a safe and healthy learning environment for children.
Demonstrate communication skills that contribute to positive relationships.
Evaluate effective conflict prevention and management techniques.
Demonstrate skills for building and maintaining positive collaborative relationships with children in their family and community environments.
Analyze developmentally appropriate practices to plan for early childhood and education.
Demonstrate integration of curriculum and instruction to meet developmental needs and interests of children considering gender, ethnicity, geographical, cultural, and global influences.
Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills in the family, workplace, and community.
Analyze career paths within early childhood, education & related services.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditCFD 102
Child Growth and Development
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
12
38
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC013SPersonal Finance
Personal Financeis designed to help students understand, manage, and create personal financial success.Students will learn about investment, banking, taxes, credit, savings, careers, and advertising.Students will build a winning resume and sharpen their interview skills as they prepare for life.The personal finance proficiency exam will be administered in accordance with state graduation requirements.
This course fulfills the Personal Finance graduation requirement.
Compare gross and net income.
Explain the purpose of standard deductions such as income taxes, social security (FICA), medicare, deductions for health care and retirement savings plans.
Explain how taxes provide public goods and services.
Analyze short, medium, and long-term savings goals including saving for high value purchases, postsecondary education/training, and retirement.
Complete IRS Form W-4 to determine the optimal amount to withhold for personal income tax.
Evaluate product information for price, quality, service, and features.
Analyze federal and state regulations which provide some remedies and assistance for identity theft.
Describe effective responses to deceptive or fraudulent sales practices.
Explain the value of consumer credit protection laws.
Examine how workers are paid through wages, salaries and commissions
Analyze why benefits such as health insurance, paid vacation, retirement plan, family leave, tuition reimbursement and flexible scheduling are considered forms of compensation.
Analyze spending habits to recognize current spending and savings trends.
Eureka High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education13
39
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC008SHousing & Interior Design
Housing & Interior Design is aproject-oriented course thatteaches the aesthetics of architectural styles, analysis of housing selection, floor plans, home furnishing and furniture arrangement.The application of the elements and principles of design will be emphasized.Career opportunities in the housing and interior design fields will be introduced.
Analyze potential career choices and determine the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and opportunities associated with each career.
Demonstrate teamwork skills in school, community and workplace settings and with diverse populations.
Demonstrate employability skills, work ethics, and professionalism.
Explain the roles and functions of individuals engaged in housing and interior design careers.
Evaluate housing and design concepts and theories, including sustainability and universal design, in relation to available resources and options.
Analyze design and development of architecture, interiors, and furnishings through the ages.
Evaluate client's needs, goals, and resources in creating design plans for housing and residential and commercial interiors.
Apply residential and commercial interior design knowledge, skills, and processes to meet specific design needs.
Demonstrate design, construction document reading, and space planning skills required for the housing, interior design and furnishings industries.
Evaluate client’s needs, goals, and resources in creating design plans for housing and residential and commercial interiors.
Apply design knowledge, skills, processes and theories and oral, written, and visual presentation skills to communicate design ideas.
Examine legislation, regulations, and public policy that affect residential and commercial interior design as well as the housing and furnishing industries.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education14
40
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC014SFamily Relations
Family Relations focuses on the family as a system for developing meaningful relationships that can provide feelings of trust and well-being. This course highlights the rights and responsibilities of partners as well as the kinship bonds with other family members, who are at different developmental levels and whose fates are interdependent.Students of Family Relations are interested in how families change over time and will study the pattern of change in family structure, roles and adaptation to life's stresses.
Analyze conditions that influence human growth and development.
Analyze the effects of family as a system on individuals and society.
Analyze how individuals and families make choices to satisfy needs and wants
Analyze the effects of social, economic, and technological changes on work and family dynamics.
Evaluate the effects of diverse perspectives, needs, and characteristics of individuals and families.
Analyze functions and expectations of various types of relationships.
Analyze personal needs and characteristics and their effects on interpersonal relationships.
Analyze the impact of conditions that could influence the well-being of individuals and families.
Demonstrate communication skills that contribute to positive relationships.
Evaluate effective conflict prevention and management techniques.
Evaluate services for individuals and families with a variety of conditions that could impact their well-being.
Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills in the family, workplace, and community
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education15
41
Career and Technical Education
Family and Consumer ScienceFC026SLife After High School
Life After High School is a comprehensive course with an overall focus to prepare students for independent living.Students will study food selection, nutrition, meal preparation, and planning with regard to their lifestyle, focusing on convenient and quick food preparation suitable for a young adult.Other areas covered will be the risks and benefits of technology, as well as clothing, maintenance, care, selection, and the building of a professional wardrobe.Students will address health and medical issues they may face on their own, as well as investigating insurance, travel needs, and related expenses with housing accommodations and leases. Students will compile a notebook/survival guide throughout the course.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education16
42
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT006SMetal Processes
Metal Processes is an introductory course in metalworking processes. In this course, students will learn about safety in the shop,drawing and planning, use of tools and machines, and the processes whichaccompany these tools and machines. Students are required to complete projects,which are designed to enhance proper tool and machinery skills and techniques.
Explain the idea of a safety culture and its importance in the construction crafts.
Use a standard ruler and a measuring tape to measure.
Demonstrate proper selection and use of metalworking tools.
Interpret information and instructions presented in both verbal and written form.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education1
43
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT015SWood Processes 1
Wood Processes 1 is an introductory course in woodworking technology. It includes the following: safety in the shop, drawing and planning, use of tools and machines, and the processes which accompany these tools and machines. Students are required to complete projects which are designed to enhance proper tool and machinery skills and techniques.
Explain the idea of a safety culture and its importance in the construction crafts.
Use a standard ruler and a measuring tape to measure.
Demonstrate proper selection and use of woodworking tools.
Interpret information and instructions presented in both verbal and written form.
Identify various types of building materials and their uses.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education2
44
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT016SIT017SWood Processes 2
Wood Processes 2includes wood and its classifications, forms of construction, machines and tools, machine and tool processes.Students may work on projects of their own design and choice.The class work in this course consists of the study of individual machines, materials used in woodworking, and safety in the use of equipment.
Passing grade in Wood Processes 1
Explain the idea of a safety culture and its importance in the construction crafts.
Use a standard ruler and a measuring tape to measure.
Demonstrate proper selection and use of woodworking tools.
Interpret information and instructions presented in both verbal and written form.
Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education3
45
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT020SDrafting 1
Drafting 1 provides students the opportunity to become familiar with the fundamentals of drafting and the significance it has in our present way of life. This course allows the student to explore the major areas of manual drafting and an introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). In this course, students will utilize manual drafting tools to accurately create technical drawings, utilize Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) software to create technical drawings and sketch and accurately dimension 3D objects using multiple views and perspectives.
Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to plan a project.
Develop accurately dimensioned technical sketches drafted by hand.
Conceptualize a three-dimensional form from a two- dimensional drawing to visualize proposed work.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education4
46
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT021SDrafting 2
Drafting II is a continuation of concepts learned in Drafting I, with emphasis on CAD techniques. Areas to be covered include geometric construction, exploded views, sectional views, auxiliary views, revolutions, dimensioning, pictorials, assembly drawings, and working drawings.
Successful completion of Drafting 1.
Conceptualize a three-dimensional form from a two- dimensional drawing to visualize proposed work.
Develop technical drawings drafted by hand or computer-generated plans to design structures.
Read, interpret, and use technical drawings, documents, and specifications to plan a project.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education5
47
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
IT051SArchitectural Drafting 1
Architectural Drafting is a basic course in the study of residential architectural principles and drafting design. In this semester long course, students will design a house for a client. Through this process, students will learn a variety of skills.
Successful completion of Drafting 1.
Study the history of architecture to gain a better understanding the evolution of architectural styles.
Develop floor plans, foundation plans, elevations, and site plans.
Construct a three-dimensional model of their house design.
Use computer aided design software throughout the course.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education6
48
Career and Technical Education
Industrial and Engineering Technology
CMA001SCMA002SConstruction
Construction is one part of the combined Geometry in Construction course. Through hands-on learning experiences and the building of an actual structure, students will apply geometry concepts to a variety of construction processes in order to see the connection between the two.Students will gain a hands-on understanding of basic construction methods, construction safety, and the variety of tools needed for different construction tasks.Through this course, students will be exposed to a variety of construction trades and the skills needed to succeed in the construction industry.This contextual learning experience allows students to see a variety of geometry concepts used in a real-world setting.Students will be enrolled in two courses and receive both a CTE and a Geometry credit.
Successful completion of Algebra 1.
Students must enroll concurrently in MAC017S/MAC018S Geometry-Geometry in Construction.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education7
49
Career and Technical Education
JournalismSP017SSP018SIntroduction to Digital Media Production
Introduction to Digital Media Production is a performance-based class in which students learn basic principles of journalism, preparation, delivery, and post-production skills related to broadcast media. Students will understand, explain, and practice broadcast journalism principles and ethics. They will also produce a variety of broadcast student-produced products and apply basic knowledge of broadcast technology to on-camera/on-air work.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create and evaluate relevant and engaging story packages following journalistic style and publication guidelines.
Produce and evaluate audio and video that is technically proficient and enhances storytelling.
Produce and evaluate well-designed audience-ready packages using post-production technology to enhance the story as needed.
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Eureka High School, Marquette High School, Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education1
50
Career and Technical Education
JournalismSP204SSP205SDigital Media Production
Digital Media Production allows students to enhance and practice their preparation, delivery, and post-production skills. Digital Media Production may require work outside of the regular class period. Students will create broadcasts and multimedia projects like public service announcements, commercials, documentary pieces, features, and podcasts. In addition, they will make content, coverage, and design decisions following journalistic standards introduced in the prerequisite course.
Successful completion of Introduction to Digital Media Production or teacher approval.

In buildings that don't offer Introduction to Digital Media Production, students must successfully complete Journalism Writing and Reporting (found under Language Arts) or Visual Journalism or teacher approval.
A grade of "B" or better in Introduction to Digital Media Production is strongly recommended.
This course may require work outside of the regular class period.
Students are expected to commit to this class for both semesters.
Digital Media Production satisfies the Career and Technical Education requirement.
Digital Media Production may be repeated for additional elective credit.















Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create and evaluate relevant and engaging story packages following journalistic style and publication guidelines.
Produce and evaluate audio and video that is technically proficient and enhances storytelling.
Produce and evaluate well-designed audience-ready packages using post-production technology to enhance the story as needed.
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Meet responsibilities associated with individual roles.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education2
51
Career and Technical Education
JournalismPB010SVisual Journalism
Visual Journalism is designed to teachthe basic principles of journalism, layout and design, photojournalism, and desktop publishing. Students will be utilizing state-of-the-art desktop publishing tools. The will create publication-ready materials, which may include, but are not limited to, flyers, newspaper spreads, magazine layouts, yearbook spreads, advertisements, and information graphics. Throughout the course, they will need to demonstrate knowledge of the law and ethics of journalism as well as an understanding of Associated Press style.
Visual Journalism is the prerequisite for students who are interested in the design aspects of News Production, Yearbook Production, or with teacher approval for Radio Production.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Obtain, utilize and evaluate photos/artwork that documents the history and adhere to professional and ethical standards.
Analyze and create well-designed, audience-ready materials.
Create materials using industry-standard software.
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education3
52
Career and Technical Education
JournalismPB002SPB003SNews ProductionYes
News Production is a practical lab class where students produce news media. Students will gain practical experience in writing, editing, marketing, photography, and desktop publishing. This is a co-curricular course that may require work outside of the regular class period. Students enrolled in this class will create and publish the school publication. They will make content, coverage, and design decisions following accepted journalistic standards taught in the prerequisite courses. It is also expected that students will participate in revenue building activities to support thefinancial obligations of the production.
Journalism Writing and Reporting (found under Language Arts)or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism), or teacher approval.A grade of "B" or better in Journalism Writing and Reporting or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism) is strongly recommended. Students may also take this class with teacher approval.Students are encouraged to take News Production for both semesters. This course satisfies the Career and Technical Education (CTE) requirement. This course may be repeated for additional elective credit.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create and evaluate stories based on research, incorporating journalistic style.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Obtain, utilize and evaluate photos/artwork that document history and adhere to professional and ethical standards.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Produce a well-designed, audience-ready publication using technology that is the industry standard.
Develop and implement a budget and a plan to build an audience and to generate revenue.
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Meet responsibilities associated with individual staff roles.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education4
53
Career and Technical Education
JournalismPB004SPB005SYearbook Production
Yearbook Production is a practical lab class where students produce the school yearbook. This is a co-curricular course that may require work outside of the regular class period.Students in this class are responsible for the creation of the school yearbook. During the course of the year, they will experience theme development, journalistic writing, design, marketing, photography and publishing. Students will make content, coverage, and design decisions following journalistic standards taught in prerequisite courses. They are also expected to participate in revenue-building activities to support the financial obligations of the production.
Journalism Writing and Reporting (found under Language Arts) or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism), or teacher approval.A grade of "B" or better in Journalism Writing and Reporting or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism) is strongly recomended. Students are expected to commit to this class for both semesters or one semester with teacher approval. This course satisfies the Career and Technical Education (CTE) requirement. This course may be repeated for additional elective credit.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create and evaluate stories based on research, incorporating journalistic style.
Produce and evaluate a well-designed, audience-ready publication using technology that is the industry standard.
Take, select and evaluate photos demonstrating a mastery of photo composition.
Develop and implement a theme that sets the scene for the school year and creates a personality for the book.
Develop and implement a budget and a plan to build an audience and to generate revenue.
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Meet responsibilities associated with individual staff roles.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical Education5
54
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Biomedical ScienceIT060SIT061SPrinciples of Biomedical Sciences
Principles of Biomedical Sciences is designed to provide an overview of the Biomedical Sciences Program. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes, and an introduction to bioinformatics.They will also investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholestolemia, and infectious diseases. Students will use Vernier probes and LabVIEW software to take various heart measurements, including EKG, blood pressure, and heart rate. Students will also perform DNA gel electrophoresis, Gram stain bacteria, and prepare and present a grant proposal. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and after determining the factors responsible, students will investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life.
Students may also take this course for science credit. Please see your counselor for details.

This course may be eligible for college credit. Please see the Principles of Biomedical Sciences teacher for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0
Career and Technical Education, Science
YesArticulated CreditBIO 104Basic Lab Methods
Non-trasnferrable credit; coursework waived if student attends STLCC
1
55
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Biomedical ScienceIT062SIT063SHuman Body Systems
Human Body Systems isthe second course in the Biomedical Sciences Program. Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis.Students will design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration.Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases, and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.
Successful completion of Principles of Biomedical Sciences.

Students may also take this course for science credit. Please see your counselor for details.

It is required that students continue to take college preparatory math and science in conjunction with this program.

This course may be eligible for college credit. Please see the Human Body Systems teacher for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0
Science, Career and Technical Education
YesArticulated Credit2
56
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Biomedical ScienceIT072SIT073SMedical InterventionsYes
Medical Interventions is the third coursein the Biomedical Science Program. Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family.The course is a "How-To" manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body.Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail.Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.
Successful completion of Principles of Biomedical Sciences and Human Body Systems.

.
Students may also take this course for science credit. Please see your counselor for details.


Students must concurrently enroll in college preparatory math and science in conjunction with this program.

This course may be eligible for college credit. Please see the Medical Interventions teacher for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0
Career and Technical Education, Science
YesArticulated Credit3
57
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Biomedical ScienceIT074SIT075SBiomedical InnovationsYes
Biomedical Innovations is the final course of the PLTW Biomedical Science sequence. Students build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous courses to design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century.Students address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. They have the opportunity to work on an independent design project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution.
Successful completion of Medical Interventions.


Students may also take this course for science credit. Please see your counselor for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12YearTraditional Seated1.0
Career and Technical Education, Science
YesArticulated Credit4
58
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT039SIT040SIntroduction to Engineering Design Yes
Introduction to Engineering Design teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process.Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using 3-D solid modeling software.Once the model is created, the object can be observed from many different viewpoints:animated, textured, highlighted, or proportioned.This is the industry standard for the twenty-first century.
Successfully completed or enrolled in Algebra I.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80 percent on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn three hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead the Way website; www.pltw.org.

Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditEGR 147
Introduction to Engineering Design
1
59
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT041SIT042SPrinciples of Engineering Yes
Principles of Engineering helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology.Students will explore various technology systems and manufacturing processes, as well as learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people.The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change.
Successfully completion of Algebra I.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80 percent on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn three hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead the Way website; www.pltw.org.

Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditGE 121
Principles of Engineering
2
60
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT035SIT036SDigital Electronics Yes
Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied logic that encompasses the application of electronic circuits and devices.Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in many devices, i.e., video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, etc.Students will learn to apply Boolean equations, use computer simulation software for designing and testing digital circuitry, and how to bread board and wire functional circuits on various devices.
Succesfully completion of Introduction to Engineering Design or Principles of Engineering.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80% on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn 3 hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead the Way website; www.pltw.org.

Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditEE 121
Fundamentals of Digital Electronics
3
61
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT058SIT059SAerospace Engineering Yes
The major focus of the Aerospace Engineering (AE) course is to expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight, and engineering. Students will be introduced to the Project Lead The Way activity-based, project-based, and problem-based learning through exploring the world of aerospace engineering.Students should have experience in physics, mathematics, and Industrial and Engineering Technology.
Successful completion of Engineering Design or Principles of Engineering.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80% on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn 3 hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead The Way website; www.pltw.org.


This course receives a weighted grade.
Employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of aerospace problems
Engage in engineering design problems related to aerospace information systems, astronautics, rocketry, propulsion, physics, space life sciences, the biology of space science, principles of aeronautics, structures and materials, and systems engineering.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated Credit4
62
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT037SIT038SComputer Integrated Manufacturing Yes
Computer Integrated Manufacturing applies the principles of robotics and automation.It will build on the principles learned in the three foundation courses (Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, and Digital Electronics), and will specifically utilize computer solid modeling skills in IED.Students will use CNC and rapid prototyping equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs.Fundamental concepts of robotics used in automated manufacturing and design analysis are included as well.
Successfully completedIntroduction to Engineering Design or Principles of Engineering

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80% on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn 3 hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead The Way website; www.pltw.org.

This course receives a weighted grade.
This course may be available for articulated college credit. See the Computer Integrated Manufacturing teacher for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditME 121
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
5
63
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT056SIT057SCivil Engineering and Architecture Yes
Civil Engineering and Architecturehelps students understand the field of civil engineering and architecture.Students will explore the concept of project planning from conceptualization to completion.Areas explored are: surveying, soil sampling, water pressure, floor plan design, structural engineering and roof systems.
Successfully completedIntroduction to Engineering Design and/or Principles of Engineering.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80% on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn 3 hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead The Way website; www.pltw.org.

This course receives a weighted grade.
This course may be available for articulated college credit. See the Civil Engineering and Architecture teacher for details.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated Credit6
64
Career and Technical Education
PLTW Pre-EngineeringIT045SIT046SEngineering Design & Development Yes
Engineering Design & Development is acapstone course wherestudents work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process.Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem.After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities.Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel.
Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, and one additional pre-engineering course, or teacher approval for students with significant STEM experience.

Upon successful completion of this course and at least an 80% on the comprehensive assessment at the end of the course, students can earn 3 hours of college credit from many universities nationwide. A list of these universities is available on the Project Lead The Way website.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Career and Technical EducationYesArticulated CreditME 121
Engineering Design and Development
7
65
Career and Technical Education
Project InterfaceEL021SEL022SProject Interface
Project Interface provides an opportunity for high school seniors to apply their skills in a real-world situation. Project Interface provides a unique partnership between businesses and a team of students or an individual student. Businesses contribute time, expertise and the resources of their professional staff, while Rockwood students offer energy and enthusiasm in completion of a project or observation and research that meets the needs of the corporate partner. Project Interface is designed and intended to reinforce skills taught in the classroom environment by providing the opportunity for practical application in a corporate setting. Those specific skills are in the area of: •Written Communications •Oral Communications •Interpersonal Skills •Problem-Solving/Decision Making •Computer Technology Application •Self-Directed Learning
Students must complete an application, submit two teacher recommendations and one counselor recommendation and receiveapproval of the Project Interface Facilitator or the Partners in Education Coordinator.
Students may participate in one of the following sessions:
•Summer (between junior and senior year)
•School Year (beginning in the fall)

Students must have a 3.0 GPA at the end of their sophomore year to participate in the program. The Project Interface projects are custom-designed around basic objectives combined with products or services specific to the participating business partner. The students work on a team or individual student internships under the direction of the business partner and the Project Interface staff to complete their project assignment. All Project Interface students must attend an orientation and training and will receive instruction on documenting the progress of their project. Project Interface is an opportunity for students to become self-directed learners and to function as a team in a business setting.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Career and Technical Education
66
ElectivesArtEL001SEL002SStudy Hall
Students may enroll in one Study Hall per semester.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated5
67
ElectivesEL080SFreshman Seminar
Freshman Seminar is a one-semester, elective course that introducesninth grade studentstosome important keys to high school success. This pass/fail course offers students instruction in study skills, organization strategies, goal setting and time management techniques. It introduces freshmen to the culture of their specific high school, focusing on the traditions, activities, and services available. Students work on high school planning, and explore post-secondary career options. Students have one-on-one conference time with the teacher throughout the semester.
Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School, Eureka High School
09SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective1
68
ElectivesEL005SCommunity Service
Community Serviceis designed for those seniors interested in learning about and performing community service. Each student will be responsible for researching, selecting, developing, implementing, and assessing a community service project. Students will research community needs and issues and be required to present the material in a variety of forms. Written and oral communication will be an integral part of this course.
Instructor permission based on application and interview process.
Generate questions and ideas to identify needs within the community.
Identify, define, and describe problems and solutions from multiple perspectives.
Plan and design methods to collect reliable data.
Communicate with community agencies to develop an understanding of organizational purposes and goals.
Apply, present, and comprehend information in different contexts.
Use technological tools to locate, select, organize and present information.
Plan and create written, visual, and oral presentations, both formal and informal.
Eureka High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective2
69
ElectivesEL006SEL007SCadet Teaching Program
Cadet Teaching gives high school juniors and seniors interested in becoming teachers, pre-vocational information and experience.The program consists of classroom instruction using the Cadet Teaching Curriculum and field work with a cooperating teacher at either the elementary or secondary level.
Student must complete an application and be approved by the instructor prior to taking the course.

Students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA, consistent attendance, no record of in school or out-of-school suspensions, excellent teacher recommendation, and minimum of "B" grade in the course for which he/she plans to Cadet teach.
Students must provide transportation to the school where they are assigned to serve as a Cadet Teacher.

Cadet Teaching field work hours may be used for students enrolled in the A+ program to fulfill a portion of the tutoring/mentoring requirements. Please speak with the A+ Coordinator at your high school.

Each Rockwood high school is able to specify the amount of time the Cadet Teacher spends in class instructional time in addition to the amount of time the cadet spends doing field work.

This course may be taken for either half or full credit.
Eureka High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective3
70
ElectivesEL095SEL096SEnglish Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 9-12
ESOL 9-12 is designed to assist ELL students who are, due to a language barrier or lack of prior school opportunities, functioning at a level below that which is required prior to enrolling in Rockwood School District. The English as a Second Language (ESL) Curriculum builds a strong foundation and understanding of the basics of the English language, with an emphasis on skill development. Students are provided with opportunities to acquire both social and academic language that will allow them to be successful in and beyond the classroom. There are two instructional strands in the course; the first encompasses social and intercultural interaction along with the language associated with classroom instruction.The second targets the unique contextual use of language in the content areas. Instructional strands are closely aligned to the Rockwood High School Course curricula.
Students must qualify as an eligible ELL student.
This course can be taken for elective credit only.

This course will not fulfill any of the Language Arts course requirements set forth by the Rockwood School District and the State of Missouri to earn a high school Language Arts credit.

This course may be taken more than once upon recommendation of instructor.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Elective4
71
ElectivesEL012SEL013SOffice Aide
Students who desire to work for an Administrative Office, Attendance Office, Counseling Office, or Library may acquire an application form from the Counseling Office. Duties could include delivering mail and hall passes, assembling mailings, and various office tasks. No credit is given for the work, although the experience gained through the use of interpersonal skills would be beneficial.
A job application must be completed and approved before the student may start working in an office.
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated6
72
Fine ArtsArtAR025SWorld Art
World Art provides a crafts focus as an alternative to traditional drawing and painting.Studentsuse techniques of fiber arts, sculpture, and metalworking to create original two- and three-dimensional artworks. They are inspired by the artwork from European, African, Pre-Columbian, and Asian cultures.Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art is related to history and culture. If a student enjoys this course, and wants further study, Art Fundamentals must be taken before proceeding to intermediate level art courses.
Create artwork that demonstrates the use of Form: Relief (high and low), Freestanding/In-the-round, Organic, Geometric.
Create artwork that demonstrates the use of Unity as created through repetition.
Create an artwork using a fiber arts process (e.g. weaving, paper-making, paper cutting, book arts, quilting, applique, basketry, knotting, batik).
Create artwork that has a functional (utilitarian and/or ceremonial) purpose based on a cultural example.
Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts1
73
Fine ArtsArtAR026SArt Fundamentals
Art Fundamentals is the introductory course for students who havean interestor wish to pursue acareer in visual arts.Inspired by observation and imagination, studentsexpress themselves through the themes of still life, landscape and portrait.They learn about and use drawing, painting, and sculptureto create two- and three-dimensional artworks.Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art is related to history and culture.
Demonstrate portrait proportions.
Demonstrate the illusion of depth including perspective, overlapping, placement, size, proportion, and details.
Demonstrate the illusion of form including value and shading.
Use the color wheel and mix colors.
Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Fine Arts2
74
Fine ArtsArtAR027SDrawing 1
Drawing 1 studentsdevelop technical skills in the use of drawing media. They create original two-dimensional artworks based upon the themes of observation, expressive figure/portrait, architecture, landscape, still life, and personal communication of an idea. Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, printmaking, and understanding how art is related to history and culture.
Completion of Art Fundamentals is required.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended.
Create an artwork that demonstrates the illusion of space through two-point perspective, atmospheric perspective, overlapping and change in size/detail/placement.
Create artwork demonstrating a range of values and techniques in a variety of media to create gradated tone.
Create an artwork showing the illusion of form using a seven-value range and reflected light.
Identify accurate universal human facial and/or figure proportions.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - On Campus, Online - Off Campus
First Time Credit0.5Fine Arts3
75
Fine ArtsArtAR028SDrawing 2
Drawing 2 studentsdevelop advanced technical skills in the use of drawing media. They create original two-dimensional artworks based upon the themes of perspective from observation, narrative art/historical documentation, reflection and transparency, figure, printmaking techniques, and the development of a thematic idea through a series of related works.
Successful completion of Drawing 1.
A grade of C or better in Drawing 1 is recommended
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how drawing evolved in the history of art.Create artwork showing the illusion of form using a ten-value range and reflected light.
Create artwork showing the illusion of form using a ten-value range and reflected light.
Create a wide range of color intensities using local/actual/real color.
Use the illusion of depth as a compositional element for means of communication.
Create artwork showing the relationship between the size, shape, and placement of body features exactly match the specific details of an observed model in a foreshortened pose.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts4
76
Fine ArtsArtAR029SPainting 1
Painting 1 students learn touse watercolor and acrylic paint techniques to create original two-dimensional artworks.Theyexpress themselves through the themes of observation, still life, portrait, landscape, and a student-selected conceptual theme. Work will be inspired by the historical study of Baroque, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Expressionism/Fauve, and Cubism.
Completion of Art Fundamentals is required.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand historical influences on the evolution of painting.
Apply and identify color theory through color schemes, intensity, expressive vs. local/actual/real hue, optical color effects.
Blend paint through a wide range of color and value.
Create illusion of form through application of value, lighting direction and cast shadow.
Create a unified and balanced composition.
Create textural effects through a variety of techniques.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts5
77
Fine ArtsArtAR030SPainting 2
Painting 2 students develop advanced watercolor and acrylic (or oil) paint techniques to create original two-dimensional artworks. They express themselves through the themes of observation, expressive painting, figure, landscape/cityscape, and portrait. Work will be inspired by the historical study of American Realism, Surrealism, and Postmodernism.
Successful completion of Painting 1.
A grade of "C" or better in Painting 1 is recommended.
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand historical influences on the evolution of painting.
Use paint expressively.
Determine whether a particular direction in their work is effective.
Determine their purpose and intention and how it is conveyed to a broader audience.
Determine criteria to evaluate a work of art.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts6
78
Fine ArtsArtAR031SSculpture 1
Sculpture 1 studentsdevelop technical skills in the use of various media such as plaster, clay, paper, wire, and found objects. Theycreate original, three-dimensional artworks using modeling, carving, assemblage, and casting methods. Students work with the following themes:observation, the human figure, personal expression, and public sculpture.
Completion of Art Fundamentals is required.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art is related to history and culture.
Create an abstract sculpture.
Create a sculpture that expresses a personal or cultural issue.
Create an organic sculpture.
Create a sculpture based upon the human figure.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts7
79
Fine ArtsArtAR032SSculpture 2
Sculpture 2 students develop advanced technical skills in the use of various media such as plaster, stone, clay, and found objects. They create original, three-dimensional artworks using modeling, carving, assemblage, and casting methods. Students express themselves through the following themes: observation, portrait, installation, monuments, and a post-modern piece on a student-selected personal or cultural issue.
Successful completion of Sculpture 1.
A grade of "C" or better in Sculpture 1 is recommended.
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art is related to history and culture.
Understand and demonstrate the 4 processes of creating sculpture.
Understand the significance of sculpture in the areas of: Public/Site Specific, Interior Design, and Monumental.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts8
80
Fine ArtsArtAR033SGraphic Design 1
Graphic Design 1 studentsexplore visual communication as it applies to commercial art careers. Theycreate original posters, designs for magazines or books, illustrations, and communicate identity through logo designs. Students use the technical skills of traditional drawing and painting in programs such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator computer software programs.
Completion of Art Fundamentals is required.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand the evolution of letterforms and origins of graphic design in the history of art.
Create artwork using typographic sign.
Create artwork using a symbol or implied shape as a brand-mark.
Create artwork using Adobe Photoshop toolbar, layers panels, Color panels, and file saving formats.
Create artwork using Adobe Illustrator toolbar and Color panel.
Create an original artwork that communicates social commentary to a mass audience.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.59
81
Fine ArtsArtAR034SGraphic Design 2
Graphic Design 2 students develop advanced technical skill in the use of traditional media, mixed media, and Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Flash Macromedia and InDesign software programs.They create original designs targeted for a mass audience. Students will communicate ideas through the themes of metaphors, instructional or informational illustration, advertising campaign, motion graphics, and environmental or package design (three-dimensional).
Successful completion of Graphic Design 1.
A grade of "C" or better in Graphic Design 1 is recommended.
Analyze and critique design products, discuss aesthetic issues, and relate graphic works to the historical periods in which they were created.
Demonstrates proficiency using layers, masking, type effects and pen tool in Photoshop.
Demonstrates proficiency using shape builder techniques, pen tool and layers in Illustrator.
Demonstrates proficiency using masterpages, guides, imported text, images, flowing text and text wrapped around images in InDesign.
Create graphic artwork in which you use more than one platform (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Flash).
Create an identity system for a product, company, or theme such as: logos, brochures, package design, point-of-purchase, and/or trade-show booth graphics.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts10
82
Fine ArtsArtAR035SCeramics 1
Ceramics 1 studentsdevelop and use ceramic hand-building methods and decorative surface techniques toexpress themselves through the themes of ceremonial containers, utilitarian art, and representational sculpture. Studentscreate original functional and non-functional pieces.
Successful completion of Art Fundamentals.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended.
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how ceramic objects have been used in history across many cultures.
Use glaze as a decorative finish.
Create footed pinch-formed object that has 1/4" thick walls.
Create coil-built vessel that is 8" in any dimension.
Create a slab-built form that has beveled joints and welded seams.
Analyze artworks to determine how they would be valued according to each aesthetic theory.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts11
83
Fine ArtsArtAR036SCeramics 2
Ceramics 2 students develop and use ceramic hand-building methods, wheel throwing, and decorative surface techniquesandexpress themselves through the themes of ceremonial containers, utilitarian art, and representational sculpture.They create original functional and non-functional pieces.
Successful completion of Ceramics 1.

A grade of "C" or better in Ceramics 1 is recommended.
Analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how ceramic objects have been used in history across many cultures.
Create a symmetrical bowl with ¼” thick walls, 3” tall, and 5”” wide.
Create a symmetrical cylinder with straight walls and is ¼” thick, 3” tall, and 3”wide.
Create a symmetrical plate ¼” thick, with surface 5” wide and 1” tall.
Create a trimmed thrown piece.
Create a functional artwork that communicates personal ideas and values.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts12
84
Fine ArtsArtAR037SPhotography 1
Photography 1 studentsexplore the world of 35mm black and white photography.They learn to operate a single lens reflex camera, process film and develop their photographic prints.Students create original photographs, expressing themselves through the following themes: pattern/reflection/shadow, portrait, motion, and environment.Some fees may apply.
Completion of Art Fundamentals is required.
A grade of "C" or better in Art Fundamentals is recommended.
Analyze and critique photographs, discuss aesthetic issues, understand the historical development of photography, and relate a photographer’s work to the society in which it was created.
Manipulate a camera through knowledge of its parts and of the film tank/chemicals.
Process with dark room chemicals.
Use an enlarger.
Create prints from negatives.
Utilize composition terms to create a successful image.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts13
85
Fine ArtsArtAR038SPhotography 2
Photography 2 studentscontinue to develop technical skill with traditional black and white photography.They also use digital cameras and computer software to manipulate and refine color and black and white images.Students will be inspired by various types of landscape, Surrealism, studio/commercial, portraiture, and documentary/photojournalism movements within photography anddevelop an individual artistic style through research and experimentation.They express themselves through the themes of studio work, self-portrait, time exposure, and conceptual/narrative photography.Some fees may apply.
Successful completion of Photography 1.
A grade of "C" or better in Photography 1 is recommended
Analyze and critique photographs, discuss aesthetic issue, and relate historical styles in photography to their own work and that of other photographers.
Manipulate a DSLR through knowledge of its parts..
Navigate Photoshop and/or Lightroom.
Create prints using negative manipulation.
Mount photos.
Utilize film/darkroom chemicals/enlargers.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts14
86
Fine ArtsArtAR001SAR002SAP Art HistoryYesYes
Advanced Placement Art History engages motivated students in thestudy ofcollege level art history.Students gain an understanding of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts.Students examine major forms of artistic expression from pre-history to the present.This study of art history enriches student knowledge in the fields of both art and history.
No prior experience in art history is needed.

Students are expected, but not required, to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May.
Describe, critically analyze, and interpret artworks.
Trace artistic influences and evaluate art from various aesthetic perspectives.
Compare and contrast artwork in terms of time period, place/culture, artist, style, elements and principles of art, technical processes, themes, and the function of the work in its historical context.
Complete the process of art criticism for historical artworks, comparing and contrasting how the work would have been judged when/where it was created with how it is judged today.
Evaluate artworks in historical context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and their functions and effects.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine ArtsYesAP15
87
Fine ArtsArtAR004SAR005SAP Art Studio 1YesYes
The Advanced Placement Studio program engagesmotivated students incollege entry-level work in studio art.During the course, students produce a portfolio of workthat can be submitted to the College Board at the end of the year for AP credit.Some colleges also require portfolio workfor admission and/or competitive scholarships.Through teacher-directed assignments, students will use a range of approaches to create original artwork that demonstrates technical skills in a wide range of media through a variety of themes. They also complete a sustained investigation that consists of a body of work around a student-selectedtheme.Reflective writing is a significant part of the student’s portfolio.
It is recommended that students successfully complete four semesters of high school art prior to AP Art Studio 1 enrollment with grades of "A" or "B."
Students who do not meet the above requirement but who have at least one advanced course (Drawing 2, Painting 2, Ceramics 2, Graphic Design 2, Photography 2, Sculpture 2) may request permission to enroll from the teacher.
Creatively and systematically investigate formal and conceptual issues.
Make art as an ongoing process using critical thinking and making informed decisions.
Develop technical skills and familiarize themselves with the functions of visual elements.
Become an independent thinker who will contribute inventively and critically to culture through artmaking.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine ArtsYesAP16
88
Fine ArtsArtAR006SAR007SAP Art Studio 2YesYes
The Advanced Placement Studio program engagesmotivated students incollege entry-level work in studio art.During thiscourse, students produce a portfolio of work that is different from the portfolio created for AP Art Studio 1.Itcan also be submitted to the College Board at the end of the year for AP credit.Some colleges also require portfolio workfor admission and/or competitive scholarships.Through teacher-directed assignments, students will use a range of approaches to create original artwork that demonstrates technical skills in a wide range of media through a variety of themes. They also complete a sustained investigation that consists of a body of work around a student-selectedtheme.Reflective writing is a significant part of the student’s portfolio.
Completion of AP Art Studio 1 is required to enroll inAP Art Studio 2.
A grade of "A" or "B" in AP Art Studio 1 is recommended
Creatively and systematically investigate formal and conceptual issues.
Make art as an ongoing process using critical thinking and making informed decisions.
Develop technical skills and familiarize themselves with the functions of visual elements.
Become an independent thinker who will contribute inventively and critically to culture through artmaking.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine ArtsYesAP17
89
Fine ArtsArtAR054SArt and Design Applications (pending BOE approval)
Art and Design Applications is a class for students who have a passion for design in varying formats. The class is run as a professional creative design firm and students learn the roles within a real working environment. This class uses students’ artistic strengths to create art and design needs for school posters, banners, murals ,theatrical props, flyers, headshots/portraits, ads and more. Projects include individual and group assignments with structured criteria along with open ended concepts. Students also create self-promotional items and will learn/utilize basic photography/graphic design while completing multi-material art projects. ADA is a repeatable course.
Art Fundamentals, two additional semesters of a level 1 art class and at least one semester of a level 2 art class. A grade of B or better in previous art coursework strongly recommended.
Visualize and hypothesize to generate plans for ideas and directions for creating art and design that can affect social change.
Choose from a range of materials and methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices, following or breaking established conventions, to plan the making of multiple works of art and design based on a theme, idea, or concept.
Experiment, plan, and make multiple works of art and design that explore a personally meaningful theme, idea, or concept.
Demonstrate understanding of the importance of balancing freedom and responsibility in the use of images, materials, tools, and equipment in the creation and circulation of creative work.
Reflect on, reengage, revise, and refine works of art or design considering relevant traditional and contemporary criteria as well as personal artistic vision.
Curate a collection of objects, artifacts, or artwork to impact the viewer’s understanding of social, cultural, and/or political experiences.
Synthesize knowledge of social, cultural, historical, and personal life with artmaking approaches to create meaningful works of art or design.
Demonstrate in works of art or design how visual and material culture defines, shapes, enhances, inhibits, and/or empowers people's lives.
Critique, justify, and present choices in the process of analyzing, selecting, curating, and presenting artwork for a specific exhibit or event.
Investigate, compare, and contrast methods for preserving and protecting art.
Analyze differing interpretations of an artwork or collection of works in order to select and defend a plausible critical analysis.
Construct evaluations of a work of art or collection of works based on differing sets of criteria.
Eureka High School, Rockwood Summit High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
11, 12, 10SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts, Elective
90
Fine ArtsMusicMU003SGuitar 1
Guitar 1is an introductory course forstudents who wish to learn guitar. No previous experience playing guitar isnecessary. Fundamentals of standard music notation, chords, tablature and improvisation will be covered.
Students will create an original 8 measure improvised solo using a pentatonic scale pattern.
Define the characteristics of a good song and defend an example.
Connect the impact of music on a social issue or the impact of a social issue on music.
Label parts of the staff, notes and chords for standard notation and tablature.
Create a simple bass line by decoding chord symbols on a lead sheet.
Perform musical selections containing notes of 1st position.
Perform I, vi, IV, ii, V7, I chord progression in the key of C and G.
Perform I, IV, V7, I chord progression in the key of D, A and E.
Identify the parts of a steel string acoustic guitar.
Identify the differences between an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts1
91
Fine ArtsMusicMU004SGuitar 2
Guitar 2 is designed for students who wish to further their guitar skills. Instruction will include pick style and finger style playing. Students will expand chord knowledge and further develop music reading skills.
Successful completion of Guitar 1 or teacher approval.
Create 2 and 3 string power chords using the movable power chord shape and knowledge of natural scales of the 5th and 6th string.
Perform compositions using open chords and barre chords including major, minor and dominant 7 chords of E form and minor A form shapes.
Demonstrate accurate right hand posture/position for fingerstyle playing with PIMA while performing musical selections.
Improvise an 8-16 measure solo using 2 pentatonic scale patterns.
Arrange a song in a new style utilizing various chord accompaniment styles.
Play a single line melody with varying time signatures and new rhythms: sixteenth notes and dotted quarter notes and dotted eighth notes.
Perform musical selections in multiple positions.
Define the characteristics of a good song and defend an example.
Connect the impact of music on a social issue or the impact of a social issue on music.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts2
92
Fine ArtsMusicMU070SMU071SGuitar Ensemble
Guitar Ensemble is a year-long course designed to further guitar skills. Students explore advanced chord shapes and position playing as well as composition and production using modern technology.
Successful completion ofGuitar 1 & Guitar 2 or approval by instructor.
Write an original song in a folk/rock/pop style. The song will include melody, rhythm, bass line and drums.
Solo over complex chord progressions using knowledge of scale patterns and chord shapes.
Perform musical selections with varying chord structures up the neck of the guitar. 3 string jazz voicings, E form, A form, D form, C form and G form..
Create a moving bass line to follow the chord progression of the lead sheet.
Use knowledge of musical symbols to interpret a composer’s intent for a musical selection.
Perform multi-part ensembles as part of a small group (one player per part) and large ensemble (multiple players per part).
Perform intermediate to advanced literature alone and in a group.
Write essays discussing what makes a good song or that refers to literature or politics.
Perform melodies using finger style designations, PIMA, rest stroke and free stroke\ in 2nd, 5th and 7th position.
Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts3
93
Fine ArtsMusicMU011SMU012SConcert Band
Concert Band is an intermediate level ensemble. The curriculum builds on the fundamentals taught in middle school band by providing instruction on ensemble techniques and skills. Marching Band may be integrated into the band experience as a co-curricular or extracurricular activity.
Successful middle school band experience or Band Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations document.
Produce characteristic sound exhibiting tone, timbre, breathing, and posture.
Perform grade level 2-4 band literature within various styles in public settings with others.
Sight-read grade level appropriate band literature in various styles alone and with others.
Demonstrate technical proficiency on their instrument as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, articulations, key signatures, time signatures, tempo, precision, and scales/scale patterns.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing, and style.
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Infer connections between the arts or non-arts related disciplines (science, language arts, physical education/health, etc.) to the performance of band literature.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practices using Concert B-flat, C, D, E-flat, and F, and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts4
94
Fine ArtsMusicMU036SMU037SSymphonic Band
Symphonic Band is the premier performing band of the Rockwood Band Program. Training is provided in technical skills and music reading.Advanced band literature is performed.Students perform music from a broad range of musical styles. This courseenables the student to continue music training and or performance beyond the high school level.
Audition and Band Director approval. Marching band is a part of the first semester band experience (EHS, MHS, RSHS). Participation in the summer marching band program is expected for all students.

Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations document.
Produce characteristic sound exhibiting tone, timbre, breathing, and posture.
Perform grade level 3-6 band literature within various styles in public settings with others.
Sight-read grade level appropriate band literature in various styles alone and with others.
Demonstrate technical proficiency on their instrument as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, articulations, key signatures, time signatures, tempo, precision, and scales/scale patterns.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing, and style.
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Infer connections between the arts or non-arts related disciplines (science, language arts, physical education/health, etc.) to the performance of band literature.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practices using Concert B-flat, C, D, E-flat, and F, and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts5
95
Fine ArtsMusicMU022SMU023SJazz Band
Jazz Band is an enrichment course for students in large performing ensembles (concert/symphonic band, choirs, or orchestras). It is designed to further develop the instrumental music student’s interest and ability in the area of jazz studies. Students examine and perform various styles of jazz, jazz history, the harmonic structures associated with jazz, and jazz improvisation.
Students will be admitted to the class by audition and must be enrolled in a large performing ensemble or have director permission to enroll. Instrumentation for the class is limited to saxophones, trumpets, trombones, drums, guitar, bass guitar, and piano.
Students enrolled in Jazz Band are expected to meet eligibility standards as specified by the Missouri State High School Activities Association.

Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations document.
Produce characteristic sound exhibiting tone, timbre, breathing, and posture.
Perform grade level 2-5 jazz and commercial literature within various styles in public settings with others.
Sight-read grade level appropriate band literature in various styles alone and with others.
Demonstrate technical proficiency on their instrument as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, articulations, key signatures, time signatures, tempo, precision, and scales/scale patterns.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing, and style.
Perform rhythmic patterns and student transcribed jazz melodies in both jazz and commercial styles, and imitate (by ear) melodic patterns in major and minor modes, dominant and diminished 7th chords, and 12-bar blues progressions.
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Identify characteristics and contexts of various historical periods, genres, and styles.
Improvise musical ideas alone and with others using appropriate jazz and commercial style using standard jazz forms.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts6
96
Fine ArtsMusicMU015SMU016SBeginning Orchestra
Beginning Orchestra is designed for the student with little to no previous experience playing an orchestral string instrument (violin, viola, cello, or bass) or without knowledge of standard music notation. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to continue in the Rockwood High School Orchestra curriculum.
Students provide their own instruments; however, instruments are available for loan to students demonstrating financial need.
Establish basic playing position for violin, viola, cello and bass.
Demonstrate initial left hand finger placement.
Demonstrate initial finger patterns including 2-3, 1-2, and 3-4 patterns on violin/viola and corresponding patterns on all other instruments.
Continue to refine technique related to control of bowing variable (weight, speed, and placement).
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Displays ensemble skills.
Matches and manipulates pitch and maintains a steady pulse.
Identifies and performs music notation.
Evaluate performances using established criteria.
Composes and improvises new ideas.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts7
97
Fine ArtsMusicMU009SMU010SChamber Orchestra
Chamber Orchestra builds on the fundamentals taught in middle school orchestra, providing instruction on technical and musicianship skills needed to perform standard string orchestra literature from a broad range of musical styles. Composition, music literacy, and music analysis are important components of the course. Training is provided to prepare students for the advanced ensembles.
Attendance at all performances is required and part of the course grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations agreement.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Students are encouraged to participate in additional enrichment opportunities outside of the school day.
Refine shifting for defined positions.
Perform extended technique related to control of bowing variables (weight, speed, contact point).
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Displays ensemble skills.
Matches and manipulates pitch and maintains a steady pulse.
Identifies and performs music notation.
Evaluate performances using established criteria.
Composes and improvises new ideas.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts8
98
Fine ArtsMusicMU050SMU051SConcert Orchestra
Concert Orchestra focuses on the technical and musicianship skills students need to progress into the advanced ensembles. Students will perform advancing string orchestra literature from a broad range of musical styles. Composition, music literacy, and music analysis are important components of the course.
Students must audition and receive permission from the instructor.
Attendance at all performances is required and part of the course grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations agreement. Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Students are encouraged to participate in additional enrichment opportunities outside of the school day.
Demonstrate initial vibrato development.
Perform extended technique related to control of bowing variables (weight, angle, speed, and contact point).
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Correctly identify and perform basic music notation and symbols associated with the following skills and understandings to each corresponding curricular level.
Perform with style, articulation, and pitch including adjusting dynamics according to musical function of their part.
Displays ensemble skills.
Evaluate performances using established criteria.
Composes and improvises new ideas.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts9
99
Fine ArtsMusicMU017SMU018SSinfonia Orchestra
Sinfonia Orchestra focuses on advanced technical and musicianship skills in preparation for the rigor of Symphonic Orchestra. Students perform advanced string orchestra literature from a broad range of musical styles. Composition, music literacy, and music analysis are important components of the course.
Students must audition and receive permission from the instructor. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the course grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations agreement. Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.Students are encouraged to participate in additional enrichment opportunities outside of the school day.
Demonstrates correct placement of the left hand.
Performs bowing techniques.
Applies concepts in independent practice.
Displays ensemble skills.
Matches and manipulates pitch and maintains a steady pulse.
Identifies and performs music notation.
Evaluate performances using established criteria.
Composes and improvises new ideas.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts10
100
Fine ArtsMusicMU038SMU039SSymphonic Orchestra
Symphonic Orchestra is the premiere performing ensemble in the Rockwood Orchestra Program. Students study advanced string and symphony orchestra literature from a broad range of musical styles. Composition, music literacy, and music analysis are important components of the course. This course enables students to pursue music study and/or performance beyond the high school level.
Students must audition and receive permission from the instructor.

Course Requirements: Attendance at all performances is required and part of the course grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Performance Expectations agreement. Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Students are encouraged to participate in additional enrichment opportunities outside of the school day.
Demonstrates correct placement of the left hand.
Performs bowing techniques.
Displays ensemble skills.
Apply concepts in independent practice skills.
Matches and manipulates pitch and maintains a steady pulse.
Identifies and performs music notation.
Evaluate performances using established criteria.
Composes and improvises new ideas.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional SeatedFine Arts11
101
Fine ArtsMusicMU056SMU057STreble Choir
Treble Choiris an intermediate level choir for students with limited high school choral music experience and/or developing singing skills. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 3-part literature for treble voices [SSA] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture,breathing, vocal production,tone, diction,articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts12
102
Fine ArtsMusicMU005SMU006SBass Choir
Bass Choir is an intermediate level choir for students with limited high school choral music experience and/or developing singing skills. Studentsdisplay musical understanding through written and performance activities.This ensembleperforms standard 3-part literature for low voices [TTB] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval is required.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.

Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.

Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts13
103
Fine ArtsMusicMU054SMU055SMixed Choir
Mixed Choir is an intermediate level choir for students with limited high school choral music experience and/or developing singing skills. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 3-part literature for mixed voices [SAB] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Lafayette High School, Eureka High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts14
104
Fine ArtsMusicMU048SMU049STreble Chorale
Treble Choir is a large choral ensemble that performs advanced literature. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensembleperforms standard 3- and 4- part literature for treble voices [SSA(A)] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts15
105
Fine ArtsMusicMU066SMU067SBass Chorale
Bass Chorale is a large choral ensemble that performs intermediate and advancing literature. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 3- and 4- part literature for low voices [T(T)BB] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.

Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.

Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts16
106
Fine ArtsMusicMU060SMU061SConcert Chorale
Concert Chorale is a large choral ensemble that performs intermediate and advancing literature. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 4- part literature for mixed voices [SATB] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts17
107
Fine ArtsMusicMU068SMU069SBass Chamber Choir
Bass Chamber Choir is a small choral ensemble that performs advanced literature.Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities.This ensembleperforms standard 4- part literature for low voices [TTBB] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.

Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.

Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts18
108
Fine ArtsMusicMU062SMU063SMixed Chamber Choir
Mixed Chamber Choir is a small choral ensemble that performs advanced literature. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 4- and 8- part literature for mixed voices [S(S)A(A)T(T)B(B)] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.
Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events. Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment. Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Rockwood Summit High School, Lafayette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts19
109
Fine ArtsMusicMU064SMU065STreble Chamber Choir
Treble Chamber Choiris a small choral ensemble that performs advanced literature. Students display musical understanding through written and performance activities. This ensemble performs standard 4- part literature for treble voices [SSAA] in a variety of musical styles.
Audition and Choir Director approval.Participation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts20
110
Fine ArtsMusicMU034SMU035SShow Choir
Show Choir is a choreographed vocal ensemble that performs frequently throughout the year. Major emphasis is given to both singing and dancing.
Audition and Choir Director approvalParticipation in this ensemble includes performing at MSHSAA events.Students not meeting MSHSAA eligibility requirements will not be permitted to participate in those events, and may be responsible for an alternate activity or assignment.Attendance at all performances is required and part of the class grade as covered in the Rockwood School District Concert Expectations document.
Demonstrate vocal performance techniques as it relates to posture, breathing, vocal production, tone, diction, articulation.
Sight-read grade level appropriate choral literature in various styles alone and with others.
Interpret and perform music using expression such as dynamics, phrasing and style.
Demonstrate technical proficiency as it relates to rhythm, note accuracy, key signatures, time signatures and tempo.
Distinguish between quality and non-quality performances, identifying the elements of music to justify a response through listening and self-assessment.
Compose and notate melodies applying ensemble terminology and standard notation practice using pitches and rhythms learned in class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine Arts21
111
Fine ArtsMusicMU058SMU059SAP Music TheoryYesYes
The AP Music Theory course corresponds to two semesters of a typical introductory college music theory course that covers topics such as musicianship, theory, musical materials, and procedures. Musicianship skills including dictation and other listening skills, sight-singing, and keyboard harmony are considered an important part of the course. Students understand basic concepts and terminology by listening to and performing a wide variety of music. Notational skills, speed, and fluency with basic materials are emphasized.
A grade of "A" or "B" in previous music courses is recommended.

Students should be able to read and write musical notation, and it is strongly recommended that the student has acquired at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument.
Develop the ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard and represented in a score.
Development and performance of aural skills is a primary objective.
Master the rudiments and terminology of music including pitches, intervals, scales and keys, chords, meter, and rhythm.
Learn to identify, both aurally and through score reading, tonal procedures based in common-practice tonality.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Fine ArtsYesAP22
112
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR020SActing 1
Acting 1 is a theatre class that introduces skills through the studio atmosphere. Students develop acting skills, perform in class, and evaluate theatrical works. Students will apply criteria to the evaluation of artistic choices in a drama/theatre work. They will also learn to refine effective physical, vocal, and physiological traits of characters in an improvised or scripted drama/ theatre work. Creativity is also encouraged as they develop a scripted or improvised character by articulating the character’s inner thoughts, objectives, and motivations in a drama/theatre work and perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience.
Shape character choices using given circumstances in a drama/theatre work.
Apply criteria to the evaluation of artistic choices in a drama/theatre work.
Refine effective physical, vocal, and physiological traits of characters in an improvised or scripted drama/ theatre work.
Develop a scripted or improvised character by articulating the character’s inner thoughts, objectives, and motivations in a drama/theatre work.
Perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts1
113
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR021SActing 2
Acting 2 focuses on using various acting skills and theatre styles from history as they apply to scene work. This class is heavily based in performance, both individual, and group. Students in this course explore the function of history and culture in the development of a dramatic concept through a critical analysis of original ideas in a drama/theatre work. They use various character objectives and tactics in a drama/theatre work to overcome an obstacle. Students also learn to perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience and respond to what is seen, felt, and heard in a drama/theatre work to develop criteria for artistic choices.
Successful completion of Acting 1.
Explore the function of history and culture in the development of a dramatic concept through a critical analysis of original ideas in a drama/theatre work.
Use various character objectives and tactics in a drama/theatre work to overcome an obstacle.
Perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience.
Respond to what is seen, felt, and heard in a drama/theatre work to develop criteria for artistic choices.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts2
114
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR022STech Theatre 1
Tech Theatre I emphasizes behind-the-scenes theatre production. Students are introduced to the theatrical process, including set, costume, lighting, sound, makeup, and props with an emphasis on design. Students synthesize ideas from research, script analysis, and context to create a design that is believable, authentic, and relevant for a play/musical. Class size is limited for safety reasons.
Consider multiple planned technical design elements during the rehearsal process for a devised or scripted drama/theatre work
Demonstrate the use of technical elements in a drama/ theatre work.
Articulate how technical elements are integrated into a drama/theatre works.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts3
115
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR023STech Theatre 2
Tech Theatre 2 emphasizes behind-the-scenes theatre production. Students will further develop skills introduced in Tech Theatre I focusing on the theatrical process: including set, costume, lighting, sound, makeup, and props with an emphasis on design. Students create a portfolio of work that can be used in college and/or a professional theatre setting. Class size is limited for safety reasons.
Successful completion of Tech Theatre 1.
Investigate how cultural perspectives, community ideas and personal beliefs impact a drama/theatre work.
Synthesize ideas from research, script analysis, and context to create a design that is believable, authentic, and relevant in a drama/theatre work.
Create a complete design for a drama/theatre work that incorporates all elements of technology.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts4
116
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR024SStudio Directing
Studio Directing is an advanced theatre course that focuses on directing skills and the interrelationship between director and actor.Students experience the roles of director and actor in script analysis, auditions, rehearsals, and performance of scenes.
Successful completion of Acting II or Tech Theatre IIand teacher approval.
Synthesize knowledge from a variety of dramatic forms, and theatrical conventions to create the visual composition of a drama/ theatre work.
Use research and script analysis to revise physical, vocal, and physiological choices impacting the believability and relevance of a drama/ theatre work.
Present a drama/theatre work using creative processes that shape the production for a specific audience.
Use historical and cultural context to structure and justify personal responses to a drama/theatre work.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts5
117
Fine ArtsTheatre ArtsDR025SAdvanced Studio Theatre
Advanced Studio Theatre is a course for the serious theatre student. Students who take the course for the first time will create a portfolio of work that can be used in college and/or professional theatre auditions. Theatre experiences outside of class are required during the semester(I.E., performing or serving on a production crew, directing aone-act play, attending theatrical performances). Students will explore physical, vocal and physiological choices to develop a performance that is believable, authentic, and relevant to a drama/theatre work and respond to what is seen, felt, and heard in a drama/theatre work to develop criteria for artistic choices. In addition, they will use various character objectives and tactics in a drama/theatre work to overcome an obstacle and perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience. As they prepare performances, they will formulate creative choices for a devised or scripted drama/theatre work based on theatre research about the selected topic.
Successful completion of Studio Directing and teacher approval.
Explore physical, vocal and physiological choices to develop a performance that is believable, authentic, and relevant to a drama/theatre work.
Respond to what is seen, felt, and heard in a drama/theatre work to develop criteria for artistic choices.
Use various character objectives and tactics in a drama/theatre work to overcome an obstacle
Perform a scripted drama/theatre work for a specific audience.
Formulate creative choices for a devised or scripted drama/theatre work based on theatre research about the selected topic.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Fine Arts6
118
Language ArtsJournalismLA052SJournalism Writing and Reporting
Journalism Writing and Reporting is a course where students will learn the basic principles of journalism law and ethics as well as Associated Press style and apply the concepts consistently in their publications.This course is designed to prepare students with the specialized writing skills required for a newspaper or yearbook staff.Journalism Writing and Reporting is a prerequisite for News Production or Yearbook Production.
A grade of "B" or better in the most recent language arts class is recommended for a student taking Journalism Writing and Reporting.

This course fulfills ½ unit of the 4th language arts credit.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create and evaluate stories based on research, incorporating journalistic style.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Obtain, utilize and evaluate photos/artwork that document history and adhere to professional and ethical standards.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts22
119
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP024SPublic Speaking
Public Speaking is a performance course in which studentsstudy a variety of public speaking events. Areas of study include informative, persuasive, impromptu, and extemporaneous speaking.Students will deliver a variety of speeches and performances while they develop effective skills in research, organization, writing, and presentation of speeches.
This course fulfills one of the two semesters of the 12th grade language arts requirements for graduation.
Evaluate an author's argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media.
Speak audibly, and to the point, using conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose and audience when presenting including fluent and clear articulation, strategically varying volume, pitch, and pace to consistently engage listeners.
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts1
120
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP004SSDebate 1
Debate 1 is a performance course in which students explore the techniques of argumentation and persuasion as they apply to formal debate.Students will be introduced to Lincoln Douglas, Policy, and Public Forum debate. They will research and analyze the current nationally-selected debate topics and prepare arguments for both sides of the issues. Regular participated in class tournaments is required.
Successful completion of Public Speaking, Introduction to Speech Communicaiton, orteacher approval.
Evaluate an author's argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Speak audibly, and to the point, using the conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose and audience when presenting including fluent and clear articulation, strategically varying volume, pitch, and pace to consistently engage listeners.
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective2
121
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP021SDebate 2
Debate 2 is a performance coursein which students enhance their techniques of research, argumentation and persuasion as they apply to debate. Students self-select an area of study where they continue to hone their skills for effective competitive participation.Students will learn and apply all National Speech and Debate Association rules pertaining to their self-selected areas of study, research those areas of study, participate in class tournaments and local competitive tournaments.
Successful completion of Debate 1, Competitive Speaking 1, or teacher approval.

This course fulfills one of the two semesters of the 12th-grade language Arts requirements for graduation. Students are able to take this course for repeatable credit.

Debate 2 can be taken more than once; additional credits will count as elective credits.
Evaluate an author's argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and qualify or justify their own views and understanding.
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts3
122
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP007SIntroduction to Speech Communication
Introduction to Speech Communication provides an overview of the essential life and communication skills necessary for effective oral and mediated communication. Students with little or no public speaking experience may enroll in this course.They will study group communication and dynamics, verbal and nonverbal speaking skills, interpersonal communication skills, and introductory methods of presentation techniques.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue.
Speak audibly, and to the point, using the conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose and audience when presenting including fluent and clear articulation, strategically varying volume, pitch, and pace to consistently engage listeners.
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective4
123
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP001SOral Communication
Oral communication is designed to increase effective oral communication skills in interpersonal and group settings. Students will examine and refine communication techniques and leadership skills to enhance everyday relationships and facilitate current issue forums.Students will analyze and practice the communication process, compare and contrast intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills and evaluate the media's impact on communication.
Analyze the impact and the appropriate roles of personal interests and perspectives on the application of civic virtues, democratic principles, constitutional rights, and human rights.
Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the characteristics and causes of local, regional, and global problems.
Access information efficiently (time) and effectively (sources) Evaluate information critically and competently
Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world.
Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective5
124
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP022SCompetitive Speaking 1
Competitive Speaking 1 is a performance course thatinvolves the presentation of competitive oral interpretation and speaking events.This course serves as an introduction to a variety of public speaking genre including storytelling, prose, poetry, duet acting; dramatic, duo, humorous and oral interpretation; original oratory, informative and extemporaneous speaking, and congressional debate. Students will perform each of the events in front of an audience.
Public Speaking, Introduction to Speech Communication, orteacher approval

This class is typically taught 1st semester to coincide with the speech tournament schedule.

This is not an NCAA approved course if student chooses to count it toward the 4th year of English credit.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate an author’s argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media.
Speak audibly, and to the point, using the conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose and audience when presenting including fluent and clear articulation.
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence.
Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of local, state, tribal, national, and international civic and political institutions.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective6
125
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP023SCompetitive Speaking 2
Competitive Speaking 2 is a performance course that involves the presentation of competitive oral interpretation and speaking events. This course provides advanced students with an opportunity to expand, develop, and refine their competitive techniques for self-selected events in speech tournaments. Students are required to participate in local competitive tournaments and may take the course more than once.Students will self-select, cut, and organize literature selections to meet the National Speech and Debate Association rules for specific events. In addition, they are required to participate in local tournaments and apply all NSDA rules pertaining to their self-directed area of study.
Competitive Speaking 1, Debate 1, or teacher approval.
This course fulfills one of the two semesters of the 12th grade language arts requirements for graduation. Competitive Speaking 2 can be taken more than once; additional credits will count as elective credits
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate an author’s argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience and purpose .
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts7
126
Language ArtsSpeech and DebateSP015SSP016SRadio Production
Radio Production is a production class in which students learn preparation, delivery, and post-production skills related to broadcast mediausing advanced and modern broadcasting equipment. Students are required to both participate in on-air broadcastsand spendhours outside of class time as the production schedule demands. Students will enhance and practice their preparation, delivery and post-production skills. They will create and broadcast a variety of radio programs. Throughout the course, they will apply their understanding of broadcast ethics and increase their knowledge of the technical side of production.
Journalism Writing and Reporting (found under Language Arts)or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism), or teacher approval. Permission of the teacher based on application and possible interview.

A grade of "B" or better in Journalism Writing and Reporting or Visual Journalism (formerly Design and Desktop Publishing for Journalism) is strongly recommended.

Students are expected to commit to this class for both semesters or one semester with teacher approval. This course satisfies the Career and Technical Education (CTE) requirement. This course may be repeated for additional elective credit.
Understand and apply ethical practices of seeking and reporting the truth, minimizing harm, acting independently, and being accountable and transparent.
Create projects following journalistic style and Federal Communications Commission broadcast guidelines.
Record audio that demonstrates a mastery of audio production techniques
Utilize time and manage workload efficiently to set goals and meet deadlines that impact not only themselves but larger organizations.
Adapt to varied roles, jobs, responsibilities, schedules, and contexts and work effectively in a climate of ambiguity and changing priorities.
Eureka High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Elective8
127
Language ArtsLA025SLA026S09 English Language Arts
09 English Language Arts lays the foundation for successful high school reading and writing and satisfies the Ninth Grade Language Arts graduation requirement. This course consists of instruction in composition, reading fiction and informational text, grammar, speaking/listening, research and vocabulary development.
Completion of 8th Grade English Language Arts
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Language Arts1
128
Language ArtsLA017SLA018S09 Accelerated English Language Arts
09Accelerated English Language Arts lays the foundation for successful high school writing and analysis of literatureand satisfies the Ninth Grade Language Arts graduation requirement.Studentswho possessboth a strong ability and interest in the study of English and are ready to make the transition to more independent learning should consider this course. This course prepares students for Advanced Placement English coursesbut is not required for future AP enrollment. Student expectations reflect AP guidelines:faster paced, more rigorous, extended reading requiredoutside of class,and more independent learning than that of 09English Language Arts.
Completion of 8th Grade English Language Arts
A grade of “A” or “B” in 8th Grade Compacted Challenge or 8th Grade Language Arts is recommended. This course does not receive a weighted grade.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Language Arts2
129
Language ArtsLA033SLA034S09 English Language Arts RE
09 EnglishLanguage Arts RE lays the foundation for successful high school reading and writing and satisfies the Ninth Grade Language Arts graduation requirement. This course consists of instruction in composition, reading comprehension of fiction and informational text, grammar, speaking/listening, research, word study, and vocabulary development.
Completion of 8th Grade English Language Arts
This course is a two-hour block and satisfies the language arts requirement for ninth grade and one elective credit. Placement in this course is based on various assessments and teacher recommendations.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09YearTraditional Seated2.0Language Arts3
130
Language ArtsLA048SLA049S09 Advanced English Language Arts Research PresentationYesYes
9 Advanced Language Arts Research & Presentation is designed to lay the foundation for successful high school writing and analysis of literature while also emphasizing independent research skills and oral presentation skills. While not required for AP enrollment, the purpose of this course is to prepare the student for AP English courses. In addition to the skills students learn in 9 Accelerated Language Arts, students should expect that most assigned reading will be done outside of class and that most books will be analyzed as a whole rather than chapter by chapter. Students will complete process and AP-style timed writing pieces in a variety of modes (analytical, argumentative, expository, narrative and informative) on a regular basis. They will compose essays and presentations as a major part of the course grade. Students will select a research topic that will evolve into multiple large presentations that may span up to 25 minutes. Student capstone projects will focus on a national issue which will be presented to a panel of judges; this capstone will be part of students’ final exam scores.
Enrollment is based on student application submission.

Students may be required to complete summer homework for this course.

This course receives a weighted grade because of the independent out-of-class research in preparation for the extended capstone.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09YearTraditional Seated1.0Language Arts4
131
Language ArtsLA027SLA028S10 English Language Arts
10 EnglishLanguage Arts builds on the skills students learned in 09 English Language Arts and satisfies the Tenth Grade Language Arts graduation requirement. The content of this course focuses on reading and analyzing texts and producing written compositions within thematic units, culminating in an inquiry-based capstone project.
Completion of 09 English Language Arts or equivalent
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Language Arts5
132
Language ArtsLA019SLA020S10 Accelerated English Language Arts
Tenth Grade Accelerated Language Arts is designed to build on the skills students learned in Ninth Grade Accelerated Language Arts. While not required for Advanced Placement enrollment, the purpose of the course is to prepare students for Advanced Placement English courses; therefore, teachers base standards of instruction and expectations on AP guidelines resulting in faster paced, more rigorous, and more independent learning than that of Tenth Grade Language Arts.
Completion of 09 English Language Arts or equivalent
A grade of “A” or “B” in 09 Accelerated English Language Arts is recommended.

Students may be required to complete summer homework for this course.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Language Arts6
133
Language ArtsLA035SLA036S10 English Language Arts RE
10 English LanguageArts RE continues to laythe foundation for successful high school reading and writing and satisfies theTenth GradeLanguage Arts graduation requirement. This course consists of instruction in composition, reading comprehension of fiction and informational text, grammar, speaking/listening, research, word study, and vocabulary development.
Completion of 09 Grade English Language Arts
This course is a two-hour block and satisfies the language arts requirement for tenth grade and one elective credit. Placement in this course is by various assessments and teacher recommendations.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10YearTraditional Seated2.0Language Arts7
134
Language ArtsLA050SLA051S10 Advanced English Language Arts Research PresentationYesYes
10 Advanced Language Arts Research & Presentation expands upon skills of successful high school writing and analysis of literatureand satisfies the Tenth Grade Language Arts graduation requirement. Independent research skills and oral presentation skills are emphasized. This course prepares students for AP English courses, but is not required for future AP enrollment. In addition to the skills students learn in 10 Accelerated Language Arts, students should expect that most assigned reading will be done outside of class and that most books will be analyzed as a whole rather than chapter by chapter. Students will complete process and AP-style timed writingin a variety of modes includinganalytical, argumentative, expository, narrative and informative pieces on a regular basis. They will compose essays and presentations as a major portionof the course grade and select a research topic that will evolve into multiple large presentations that may span up to 35 minutes. Finally, they will create acapstone projects thatfocuses on a national issue; the project will bepresented to a panel of judges andwill be part of the final exam score.
Enrollment is based on student application materials.
Students currently enrolled in 09 Advanced English Language Arts Research & Presentation need not re-apply.

Students may be required to complete summer homework for this course.

This course receives a weighted grade because of the independent out-of-class research in preparation for the extended capstone.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support text analysis.
Determine theme/central/main idea in a text.
Analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Analyze how point of view is reflected in the characters, setting, and plot.
Evaluate an author's argument, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations concisely and logically based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices and syntax on meaning and tone.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, clear goals, deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims, evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger idea.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10YearTraditional Seated1.0Language Arts8
135
Language ArtsLA029SLA030S11 English Language Arts
Eleventh Grade English Language Arts continues to expand and reinforce the student’s skills of analysis and evaluation of literature, writing, vocabulary, research, and speaking and listening to best prepare them for a collegiate academic environment. This course is built around thematic units that explore American identity. Throughout the course, students will read fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. They will create blended writing pieces including argumentative, narrative, and informative elements. When practicing the writing process, they will learn and utilize grammar and writing instruction within the units. Research and oral communication skills, as well as academic and content vocabulary will also be regularly addressed.
Completion of 10 English Language Arts or equivalent
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate an author’s argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility, and relevance of the evidence.
Students will read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Students will read and comprehend informational texts independently and proficiently.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Language Arts9
136
Language ArtsLA021SLA022S11 Concepts of Literature and Communication
Concepts of Literature and Communication continues to expand and reinforce the student’s skills of analysis and evaluation of literature, writing, vocabulary, research, and speaking and listening that will help with a variety of post-secondary options. This course is built around thematic units that explore American identity and how students identities are shaped by society.
Completion of 09 English Language Arts and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate an author’s argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility, and relevance of the evidence.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Read and comprehend informational texts independently and proficiently.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Language Arts10
137
Language ArtsLA003SLA004SAP English-Literature & CompositionYesYes
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is designed to challenge the student of Language Arts who may elect this course to fulfill the Eleventh Grade Language Arts graduation requirement or to complete a fourth year of English study. This college-level course, overseen by The College Board, prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Test.
Successful completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent
A 3.5 GPA in Language Arts is recommended to prepare for this course.

Students are expected, though not required, to take the AP course exam.

Students may be required to complete summer homework for this class.
Involves intensive writing in response to the extensive reading of several literary genres from a variety of time periods.
Demonstrate critical and analytical thought by participating in frequent class discussions.
Refine the writing process for expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Language ArtsYesAP11
138
Language ArtsLA001SLA002SAP English-Language & CompositionYesYes
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is designed to challenge the student of Language Arts who may elect this course to fulfill the Eleventh Grade Language Arts graduation requirement or to complete a fourth year of English study. This is a college-level course, which prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Test. Students should be aware of the rigor, intensity, and scope that this course will demand. This course will further develop students' abilities as skilled analysts of a broad range of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Reading will include works of autobiographers, biographers, diarists, critics, essayists, journalists, and writers of history, politics, science and nature. The writing content will focus on lengthy expository and analytical essays. Students will compose in a variety of modes and for a variety of purposes. Students will enhance vocabulary skills, hone research skills, and practice speaking and listening skills.
Successful completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent
A 3.5 GPA in Language Arts is recommended to prepare for this course.

Students are expected, though not required, to take the AP course exam.

Students may be required to complete summer homework for this class.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Language ArtsYesAP12
139
Language ArtsLA070SLA071S12 Career Communication and Composition
This course is designed for students who are attending a post-secondary technical school, going into the military, job training program, or directly entering the workforce. This course focuses on communication and language skills as they apply in the workplace.
Successful completion of an 11th-grade English Language Arts course.
Draw conclusions, infer and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain
Evaluate an author’s argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility and relevance of the evidence.
Read and comprehend informational text independently and proficiently.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views.
In a presentation show how all aspects of communication work together to impact a message.
Utilize multimedia and/or sensory aids that effectively enhance the message and are smoothly incorporated into the presentation.
Recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and act and model in ways that are safe, legal, and ethical.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12YearTraditional Seated1.0Language Arts13
140
Language ArtsLA015SCreative Writing
Creative Writing is an upper-level writing course for students who want to further develop their passion for writing and share their writing with their peers and wider audiences.
Completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent
This course meets .5 of the fourth required English Language Arts credit.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate how an author’s choices to structure specific parts of a text contribute to a text’s overall meaning and its aesthetic impact.
Analyze a case in which recognizing point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is implied.
Evaluate how the author's word choices and use of syntax contribute to a text's overall meaning, tone, and aesthetic impact.Evaluate how the author's word choices and use of syntax contribute to a text's overall meaning, tone, and aesthetic impact.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Language Arts14
141
Language ArtsLA061SBlack Literature
Black Literature is a course for juniors and seniors wanting to explore an authentic view of multi-genre literature by black writers of Africa, America, and England, from past to present. Students will read and write about the complexities of the black experience through poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and film. They will discuss various influences on identities, cultures, beliefs, and literature while using inquiry and research to become a student activist.
Completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent

This course does not meet the Eleventh grade Language Arts credit.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Explain two or more main ideas or themes in a text, analyze their development, and relate them to human nature and the world
Read and comprehend informational texts and literature, including stories, dramas and poems, independently and proficiently
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience;
Self-select and blend (when appropriate) previously learned narrative, expository, and argumentative writing techniques.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations showing command of effective nonverbal and verbal presentation skills.
Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School, Eureka High School, Lafayette High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts15
142
Language ArtsLA054SMulticultural Literature
Multicultural Literature will examine literary selections from diverse ethnicities. Students will read high-interest, challenging and through provoking literature. They will engage in a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, biographies, and films. Research, presentations and discussions of various cultural concepts will be an integral part of the learning experience. Students will also write blended pieces of narrative, informative and argumentative writing.
Completion of 09, 10, and 11 English Language Arts or their equivalents.
This course meets .5 of the fourth required English Language Arts credit.
Determine two or more themes/central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate how an author's work reflects his or her historical/cultural perspective.
Independently read and comprehend literature, including novels, stories, dramas and poems at grade level.
Independently read and comprehend informational texts, at grade level.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and qualify or justify their own views.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts16
143
Language ArtsLA037SPopular Literature
This semester course for seniors features the study of popular literature with a focus on young adult books. Books are assigned from a teacher-generated list with an effort to ensure student choice and personalized selections for the reader. Students will read a variety of literature, engage in discussions regularly, sustain a thoughtful and reflective reading journal and produce multiple writings in response to literature.
Completion of 09, 10, and 11 English Language Arts or equivalent
This course meets .5 of the fourth required English Language Arts credit.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Evaluate the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Language Arts17
144
Language ArtsLA055SScience Fiction Literature
Science Fiction Literature is a language arts class geared toward students with an interest in science fiction literature. This particular class focuses on the introspective qualities of science fiction and the individual, and the qualities of Human Society and Culture. Students will read a healthy mixture of science fiction, short stories, novels, and related non-fiction philosophical writings (3-5 novels, approximately 15-25 short stories. Students are also expected to participate in research-based assignments and Socratic discussions.
Completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent.
This course does not meet the Eleventh grade Language Arts credit.

This course meets .5 of the fourth required English Language Arts credit.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes/central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Independently read and comprehend literature, including novels, stories, dramas and poems at grade level.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and qualify or justify their own views.
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations on the task, audience, and purpose.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts18
145
Language ArtsLA053SSports Literature and Writing
Sports Literature and Writing is a Language Arts class that will examine the unique relationship between sports and society through literature by contemporary authors, columnists and other media. Students will read high-interest and thought-provoking texts including informational text, poetry, biographies, and commentary. They will also write argumentative, informative, and narrative pieces.
Completion of 09 and 10 English Language Arts or equivalent.
This course does not meet the Eleventh grade Language Arts credit.

This course meets .5 of the fourth required English Language Arts credit.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes/central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas and poems, independently and proficiently.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media: synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and qualify or justify their own views and understanding.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language Arts19
146
Language ArtsLA059SIntroduction to College Literature
Introduction to College Literature is a college-preparatory course featuring an extensive study of short stories, novels, plays, poems, and informational text from British authors. Students will explore a minimum of three of the corresponding modules throughout the semester. This course may be eligible for the Advanced Credit Program from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Students will indulge in a wide-range of classic literature, refine their composition skills, strengthen their research skills and participate in formal and informal oral communications.
Successful completion of 09, 10, and 11 English Language Arts or equivalent
A grade of “C” or better in 11 English Language Arts or equivalent is recommended.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Read and comprehend informational text independently and proficiently.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Language ArtsYesDual CreditEnglish 1120
Introduction to Literature
320
147
Language ArtsLA007SIntroduction to College Writing
Introduction to College Writing is a college-preparatory course that is a writing intensive course. This course may be eligible for the Advanced Credit Program from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Students will focus on writing a variety of argumentative, informative, and narrative essays, strengthen their editing skills, refine research techniques and participate in discussions and present essays for peer evaluation.
A minimum of two credits of Language Arts

A grade of "C" or better in an eleventh grade course is recommended for students taking Introduction to College Writing.

This course may be eligible for the Advanced Credit Program from the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
Evaluate how an author's choices to structure specific parts of a text contribute to a text's overall meaning and its aesthetic impact.
Evaluate how an author's choices to structure specific parts of a text contribute to a text's overall meaning and its aesthetic impact.
Analyze a text in which the author's point of view is not obvious and requires distinguishing what is directly stated from what is implied.
Evaluate how the author's word choice and use of syntax contribute to a text's overall meaning and tone.
Evaluate an author's argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility, and relevance of the evidence.
Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience.
Delineate a speaker’s argument and claims evaluating the speaker’s point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.
Rockwood Summit High School, Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Language ArtsYesDual CreditENGL 1100First Year Writing321
148
Language ArtsLA060STopics in College Literature: Contemporary Novels
Topics in College Literature is a college preparatory course for students who consider themselves avid readers and want the challenge of reading more rigorous and mature content. Students will read contemporary novels from the 21st century. These novels represent the genres of historical fiction, nonfiction, diverse fiction, best-sellers, and a reader's choice and explore trends in various topics like culture, politics, literature, science, society, etc. Students will refine their composition skills and participate in formal and informal discussions. This course may be eligible for the Advanced Credit Program from the University of Missouri-St. Loui
Successful completion of 09, 10, and 11 English Language Arts or equivalent
A grade of “C” or better in 11 English Language Arts or equivalent is recommended.
Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Explain two or more central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the central ideas to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.
Read and comprehend informational text independently and proficiently
Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem.
Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Language ArtsYesDual CreditEnglish 1950Topics in Literature322
149
LibraryLIB009SLibrary Media 9-12
The Library Media program will introduce high school students to the navigation of and access to current library digital and print resources while teaching library and information skills. The program will establish a foundation for life-long reading and learning.
Individualized Learning Center
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated
150
MathArtMA016SFinite Math
Finite Math connects mathematics to career and everyday life situations. Topics include matrices, linear programming, logic, finance, probability, and counting principles. The use of a graphing calculator is incorporated throughout the course.
Successful completion of Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2
Use matrices to represent and manipulate data.
Create a linear programming model to identify important quantities and interpret the solutions in real-world context.
Understand how to apply the 4 principles (time, principal, rate and compounding periods) of finance to improve personal financial decisions.
Use equivalent statements and argument forms to test the validity of arguments.
Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts.
Use permutations and combinations to compute probabilities of compound events and solve problems.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.511
151
MathMA003SMA004SAlgebra 1
Algebra 1 engages students in the critical thinking and problem-solving skillsrequired for future success in high school mathematics. Students practicetransferringconcrete mathematical knowledge to more abstract algebraic generalizations.Technology will be used throughout the course as students explore and make sense of problems in real-world contexts.
Completion of Math 8 or equivalent
Compare the properties of two functions.
Use function notation to evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context.
Explain how each step taken when solving an equation or inequality in one variable creates an equivalent equation or inequality that has the same solution(s) as the original.
Explain how the meaning of rational exponents extends from the properties of integer exponents.
Solve problems involving quadratic equations.
Choose and produce equivalent forms of a quadratic expression or equations to reveal and explain properties.
Create and graph linear, quadratic and exponential equations in two variables.
Solve problems involving quadratic equations.
Write arithmetic and geometric sequences in recursive and explicit forms, and use them to model situations, and translate between the two forms.
Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear or exponential functions.
Translate between equivalent forms of a function to reveal and explain properties of the function and interpret these in terms of a context.
Solve a system of linear equations algebraically and/or graphically.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Math1
152
MathMMA003SMMA004S
Algebra 1-AMPED (Algebra, Manufacturing, Production, Entrepreneurship and Design)
AMPED engages students in the critical thinking and problem-solving skillsrequired for future success in high school mathematicsin an authentic business setting.The contextual learning experience combines all Algebra 1 standards and Business Entrepreneurship standards through relevant, interactive, career-centered projects.Students taking this course must also enroll in Business Management Processes and willreceive both an Algebra 1 and a CTE credit.
Completion of Math 8 or equivalent
Students must be concurrently enrolled in BMA001S/BMA002S Business Management Processes.
Explore functions including linear, exponential and quadratic;compare characteristics of these functions, and translate between graphical, numerical and symbolic representations of them.
Create and solve linear equations, linear inequalities, and systems of equations involving both linear and quadratic equations.
Use the laws of exponents tosimplify expressions involving rational exponents and radicals.
Classify and perform operations with polynomials, including factoring
Use regression techniques to describe linear relationships between quantities.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Rockwood Summit High School, Marquette High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated2.0Math2
153
MathMA017SMA018SGeometry
Geometry provides an analysis of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry. Students explore bothabstract mathematical concepts as well as real-world applications. Technological tools and manipulatives will be used to discover and explore more complex geometric situations and deepen students understanding of geometric relationships as they move toward formal mathematical arguments.
Successful completion of Algebra 1 or Algebra1-AMPED
Prove theorems and solve problems about triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.
Prove triangle congruence criteria based on analyses of rigid motions and formal constructions.
Apply similarity in right triangles to understand right triangle trigonometry and the Pythagorean Theorem.
Investigate and solve real-world problems involving area and volume.
Prove basic theorems about circles and derive the equation of a circle.
Compute and interpret theoretical and experimental probabilities.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.03
154
MathMAC017SMAC018SGeometry-Geometry in Construction
Geometry in Construction provides students an opportunity to explore complex geometric applications and deepentheir understanding of geometric relationships in the context of a construction project.This contextual learning experience combines all Geometry standards and construction standards allowing students to see a variety of geometry concepts used in a real-world setting.Students taking this course must also enroll in Construction;they will receive both a Geometry and a CTE credit.
Successful completion of Algebra 1 or Algebra 1-AMPED
Students must be concurrently enrolled in CMA001S and CMA002S Construction.
Prove theorems and solve problems about triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.
Prove triangle congruence criteria based on analyses of rigid motions and formal constructions.
Apply similarity in right triangles to understand right triangle trigonometry and the Pythagorean Theorem.
Investigate and solve real-world problems involving area and volume. Prove basic theorems about circles and derive the equation of a circle.
Compute and interpret theoretical and experimental probabilities.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0
Math, Career and Technical Education
4
155
MathMA065SMA066SHonors GeometryYesYes
Honors Geometry is a rigorous, proof-based course designed to develop spatial concepts and insight into geometric relationships. Complex algebraic principles such as systems of equations, factoring and solving quadratic equations are consistently applied to geometric problems. This course prepares students for the rigor of Honors Algebra 2.
Successful completion of Algebra 1
A grade of "B" or better is recommended in Algebra 1.
Prove theorems and solve problems about triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.
Prove triangle congruence criteria based on analyses of rigid motions and formal constructions.
Apply similarity in right triangles to understand right triangle trigonometry and the Pythagorean Theorem.
Investigate and solve real-world problems involving area and volume.
Prove basic theorems about circles and derive the equation of a circle.
Compute and interpret theoretical and experimental probabilities.
Derive and apply various advanced geometric theorems.
Write inverse and contrapositive statements for conditionals and determine the truth value for these statements.
Solve problems involving relationships between parts of a right triangle when an altitude is drawn from the right angle.
Use indirect proofs to prove theorems.
Derive and identify the relationships between segments created by chords, secants, and tangents in circles to find segment lengths.
Understand radians and use radian measure to find the arc length and area of a sector.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Math5
156
MathMA005SMA006SAlgebra 2
Algebra 2 builds upon the curriculum from Algebra 1 and extends students' repertoire of function families to include polynomial, rational and radical functions. Technology will be used as an instructional tool throughout the course.
Successful completion of Algebraic Geometry, Geometry or Honors Geometry.
Create and solve equations and inequalities, including those that involve absolute value.
Solve equations involving rational exponents and/or radicals and identify situations where extraneous solutions may result.
Identify and interpret key characteristics of functions represented graphically, with tables and with algebraic symbolism to solve problems.
Describe the effects of transformations algebraically and graphically.
Identify zeros of polynomials when suitable factorizations are available, and use the zero to sketch the function defined by the polynomial.
Create new functions by applying the four operations and composition of functions (modifying the domain and range as necessary).
Describe and explain the purposes, relationship to randomization and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
Use data from a sample to estimate characteristics of the population and recognize the meaning of the margin of error in these estimates.
Use the inverse relationship between exponents and logarithms to solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
Use properties of logarithms to solve equations or find equivalent expressions.
Create functions and use them to solve applications of quadratic and exponential function model problems.
Solve rational equations where numerators and denominators are polynomial and where extraneous solutions may result.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Math6
157
MathMA008SMA009SHonors Algebra 2 with Trigonometry YesYes
Honors Algebra 2 with Trigonometry builds upon the topics included in Algebra 2 and introduces Trigonometric skills and concepts essential for success in calculus courses. Itis an accelerated course recommended for the college-bound student who intends to follow a math-related curriculum.
Successful completion of Geometry or Honors Geometry
A grade of “B” or better in Honors Geometry and Eighth grade Algebra 1 or a grade of “A” in Geometry and Ninth grade Algebra 1 is recommended.
Solve equations and inequalities, including those that involve absolute value, radicals, quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers, exponential equations using the properties of logarithms, and rational equations.
Create, graph and analyze functions and systems of equations given real-world context.
Identify and interpret key characteristics of functions represented graphically and algebraically to solve problems.
Describe the effects of transformations of functions graphically and algebraically.
Simplify rational expressions.
Perform arithmetic operations involving complex numbers and polynomial functions.
Develop strategies for analyzing data that are collected from the result of an experiment or survey.
Explore the unit circle to define the 6 trig functions and how they correlate to the special right triangles to evaluate the 6 trig functions and find the angle for a given trigonometric ratio.
Graph the six trig functions, apply transformations to their graphs and write trig equations that model periodic phenomena.
Use various identities to complete trigonometric proofs and solve trigonometric equations including those arising from real-world context.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Math7
158
MathMA007SAlgebra 3
Algebra 3 includes applications of concepts from Algebra 2 as well as some new topics and is designed for the college-bound student. Technology will be used as an instructional tool throughout the course.
Successful completion of Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2

A grade of “C” or better in Algebra2 or Honors Algebra2 is recommended.

Algebra2 students wishing to take Pre-Calculus after Algebra3 must take both a semester of Algebra3 and a semester of Trigonometry.

Algebra 3 may not be taken after the successful completion of Pre-Calculus.

This course may be eligible for college credit. Please consult the Algebra 3 teacher for details.
Produce the graph of a conic using all critical information.
Write arithmetic and geometric sequences both recursively and explicitly using formulas and use them to model situations and translate between the two forms.
Apply the properties of sigma notation to find the sums of series.
Identify situations that can be modeled with exponential and logarithmic functions and use them to solve real-world problems.
Represent and solve polynomial and rational equations.
Graph rational functions, identifying zeros and asymptotes when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5MathYesDual CreditMath 1030College Algebra38
159
MathMA023STrigonometry
Trigonometry provides the trigonometric skills and concepts essential for success in calculus courses. It is a field of mathematics in which the geometric properties of angles and sides of triangles are used to measure lengths. This course is recommended for college-bound students.
Successful completion of Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2

A grade of “C” or better in Algebra 2is highly recommended.

This course may not be taken after the successful completion of Pre-Calculus.
Solve right triangles.
Graph trigonometric functions.
Prove trigonometric identities.
Solve trigonometric functions.
Solve for non-right triangles and find the area of oblique triangles and sectors.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Math9
160
MathMA052SStatistics
Statistical studyhas increased insociety and isrecommended for all students. This course uses a project-based learning approach. Studentswill conduct surveys, interpret collected data and make decisions about real-life situations. Applications of the tools of data collection, data analysis, and statistical inference will be emphasized for a variety of careers.
Successful completion of Algebraic Geometry, Geometry, or Honors Geometry
Draw comparative inferences from two or more sets of univariate data.
Explore, analyze, and assess the normality of univariate data.
Set up the framework for a significance test in order to make inferences about apopulation.
Analyze the least squares regression line to predict trends in data.
Use confidence intervals to estimate unknown parameters.
Interpret p-value to make a decision.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Math10
161
MathMA024SMA025SPrecalculusYes
Precalculus is a rigorous study in advanced functions and trigonometry in preparation for AP Calculus. The graphing calculator is an integral part of the analysis of functions; however, students will be required to graph and calculate without the aid of any calculator to prepare for AP Calculus, where use ofcalculators islimited.
Successful completion of Honors Algebra 2 or Algebra 3 and Trigonometry is required.
A grade of “B” or better in Honors Algebra 2 or Algebra 3 and Trigonometry is recommended for success in this course.

Analyze and graph functions.
Perform operations on polynomial and rational expressions.
Simplify trigonometric expressions using trig identities and/or unit circle values.
Solve rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic equations.
Perform basic operations on vectors.
Use sequence and series to model and solve real-world situations.
Understand the graphs and conversions of conics, polar and parametric.
Understand the basic limit process.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Math12
162
MathMA043SMA044SAP Calculus ABYesYes
APCalculusAB connects topics and representations to develop students'conceptual mathematical knowledge.Studentsapply strategies and techniques to accurately solve diverse types of problems.This college-levelcourse prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam which covers concepts in college-level Calculus 1.
Successful completion of Pre-Calculus
A grade of “B” or better in previous mathematics courses is recommended.
Work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal andunderstand connections among these representations.
Understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
Understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
Understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
Communicate mathematics both orally and in well-written sentences and explain solutions to problems.
Model a written description of a physical situation with a function, a differential equation, or an integral.
Use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and verify conclusions.
Determine the reasonableness of solutions, including sign, size, relative accuracy, and units of measurement.
Develop an appreciation of calculus as a coherent body of knowledge and as a human accomplishment.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0MathYesAP13
163
MathMA054SMA055SAP Calculus BCYesYes
AP Calculus BC includes all topics covered in AP Calculus AB and extends the content to different types of equations (polar, parametric, vector-valued) and new topics (such as Euler's method, integration by parts, and improper integrals). It alsointroduces the topic of sequences and series. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam which covers concepts in college-level Calculus 1 and Calculus 2.
Successful completion of WG Pre-Calculus.
A grade of "B" or better in previous mathematics courses is recommended.

Students taking AP Calculus BC after successfully completing AP Calculus AB may only earn credit for second semester. They must audit first semester.

This course covers many of the core conceptual objectives in AP Calculus AB; therefore, students may not take AP Calculus AB for credit upon completion of this course.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0MathYesAP14
164
MathMA014SMA015SAP StatisticsYesYes
AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.Statistical studyhas increased insociety and isrecommended for all students.An introductory statistics course, similar to the AP Statistics course, is typically required for majors such as social sciences, health science, and business. Science, engineering and mathematics majors usually take an upper-level calculus-based course in statistics, for which the AP Statistics course is consideredeffective preparation.This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Statistics exam.
Successful completion of Honors Algebra 2 or a combination of two of the four semester courses: Finite, Trigonometry, Algebra 3, or Statistics
A grade of “C” in Honors Algebra 2 or a “B” in Algebra 3, Trigonometry, Finite, or Statistics is recommended.
Describe patterns and departures from patterns while exploring data.
Plan and conducting a study to develop their understanding of sampling and experimentation.
Explore random phenomena using probability and simulations.
Estimate population parameters and testing hypotheses to make statistical inferences.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0MathYesAP15
165
MathMA056SMath in Careers
Math in Careers introduces students to specific occupations while reinforcing foundational mathematics content.Students will apply concepts through real-life scenarios in the context of relevant career opportunities,personalized instruction and a project-based framework. Students will collaborate to complete their chosen occupational mission.
Math in Careers serves as credit for high school graduation, but does not meet requirements for college entrance.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
Model with mathematics.
Use appropriate tools strategically.
Attend to precision.
Look for and make use of structure.
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12, 09
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
0.5Math16
166
MathMA060SConsumer Math
Consumer Math prepares students to become independent consumers in our society.Students study and review arithmetic skills they can apply in their personal lives and in their future careers.
Students must be a senior eligible to graduate at the end of the current school year, have no more than 3 math credits and not have a full credit of Algebra 2.
This course provides credit for high school graduation, but does not meet requirements for college entrance.
Analyze and calculate expenses incurred when purchasing/leasing an automobile or a place of residence.
Maintain accurate banking records and compare types of credit.
Analyze options when purchasing consumable goods to make a logical, educated decision.
Utilize basic investment principles to evaluate various investment opportunities.
Develop the components of a budget based upon a determined amount of earnings and taxes.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
12Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit, Credit Recover
0.5Math17
167
MathMA050SMA051SAlgebraic Geometry
This course is designed to develop spatial concepts and insight into the relationships between plane figures.Basic algebraic principles will be extended and applied to geometric problems.
Placement in this course is determined by scores on the Algebra EOC and teacher recommendation.

This course does not meet NCAA requirements.
Prove basic theorems and solve problems about triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons
Establish triangle congruence criteria based on analyses of rigid motions
Apply similarity in right triangles to understand right triangle trigonometry
Use formulas to find the volume of three-dimensional objects
Use the languages of set theory to expand their ability to compute and interpret theoretical and experimental probabilities.
Individualized Learning Center
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Math
168
Physical Education and Health
Drivers EducationEL020SDriver Education
This course is designed to meet the minimum instruction standards of the National Conference on Safety Education as prescribed by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, which includes sixty hours of classroom instruction. This course will assist students in building a firm foundation of knowledge and skill for safe and efficient driving. The purpose of Driver Education is to produce better driving citizens by developing familiarity with the vehicles operation and maintenance; knowledge of traffic laws, signs, and controls; ability to cope with hazardous or emergency situations; and safe driving practices based upon all these, plus the rights of others. Units on how emotions, attitudes, drugs, and alcohol affect driving will also be covered.
This course does not count as a Physical Education credit.
Demonstrate and describe pre and post driving procedures.
Describe knowledge of procedural steps for moving the vehicle forward and back.
Identify and demonstrate functions of vehicle equipment.
Understand and describe the orderly visual search pattern.
Demonstrate and describe knowledge of procedural steps for starting the engine and stopping the engine
Define, Recognize, and identify the purpose of pavement markings.
Define, Recognize, and identify the color, shape, and meaning of traffic control devices.
Demonstrate and describe knowledge of basic vehicle maneuvers.
Understand and develop a plan of action to prevent substantial negative effects of distractions while driving.
Define and understand defensive driving.
Understand the significant consequences of alcohol and other drugs as it relates to the driving task.
Explore the effects of drowsy driving and the impact emotions have on one’s driving.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective1
169
Physical Education and Health
HealthHE001SHealth Education
Health Education fulfills the Health Education graduation requirement and is based on the Missouri Health/Physical Education standards. Students are advisedto take this course in 9th or 10th grade. Units include: structures of, functions of and relationships among human body systems; principles and practices of physical, mental, social, and emotional health (such as, but not limited to, personal health habits, nutrition, stressmanagement); diseases and methods for prevention, treatment, and control; methods used to assess health, reduce risk factors, and avoid high-risk behaviors (such as violence, tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use); consumer health issues (such as the effects of mass media and technologies on safety and health); and responses to emergency situations. Studentsreceive 30 minutes of CPR instruction and training in the proper performance of first aid choking maneuvers.
Demonstrate understanding of structures and functions of the body systems.
Demonstrate understanding ofthe interrelationships of the body systems.
Explain impact personal behaviors have on body systems.
Analyze the external health factors that influence behaviors.
Identify the importance of emotional and mental health on overall health.
Investigate various infectious and chronic disease.
Identify various infectious and chronic diseases. Evaluate the importance of healthy relationships and behaviors.
Recognize emergency situations and respond appropriately.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Physical Education and Health1
170
Physical Education and Health
PE025SPersonal Fitness & Wellness
Personal Fitness & Wellnessis the prerequisite formany courses in Physical Education and should be taken during the 9th grade year. This course focuses on wellness skills, physical fitness assessment, physical fitness activities, and cardio-respiratory activities that promote good health. Other topics covered includenutrition, stress management, consumer health, and goal setting. Additionally, students learn how to develop a personal wellness plan.
Students may take Beginning Strength Training or Basic Aquatic classes during 1st semester if Personal Fitness & Wellness is on the student's 2nd semester schedule.
Demonstrate competency in an activity specific skill.
Create a practice plan to improve in a self-selected skill.
Monitor progress toward personal goals.
Evaluate personal practices and behaviors that reduce or prevent physical inactivity.
Exhibit proper etiquette, respect for others and teamwork while engaging in physical activity.
Recognize the value of physical activity and make it a part of their lives.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Physical Education and Health1
171
Physical Education and Health
PE029SSports and Fitness
Sports and Fitness involve participation in physical fitness activities and exposure to a variety of sport and lifetime-recreational activities. Emphasis will be placed on self-assessment, achievement, and maintaining of personal health-related physical fitness goals. Note: This is a Tier 2 course and was designed to allow students optoins to earn the other .5 PE credit after completing PFW.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness and Wellness
Demonstrate competency in an activity specific skill.
Create a practice plan to improve in a self-selected skill.
Monitor progress toward personal goals.
Evaluate personal practices and behaviors that reduce or prevent physical inactivity.
Exhibit proper etiquette, respect for others and teamwork.
Recognize the value of physical activity and make it a part of their lives.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health2
172
Physical Education and Health
PE009STeam Sports
Team Sports involves participation in activities including: Flag Football, Basketball, Volleyball, Softball, Soccer, Hockey, Team handball, and other activities based on the needs and interest of the class. Skill development, strategy, and rules will be emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to participate in recreational team competition.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness and a passing grade in either Sports and Fitness, Total Body Wellness, Beginning Weight Training, Advanced Weight Training, Basic Aquatics or Advanced Aquatics

This class may be taken two semesters for credit and additional times with teacher approval.
Demonstrate competency in movement and motor skills.
Demonstrate competency in activities that improve strength, endurance, and flexibility.
Apply appropriate tactics and strategies in various activities.
Exhibit proper etiquette, respect for others and teamwork while engaging in physical activity.
Use communication skills and strategies that promote team/group dynamics.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health3
173
Physical Education and Health
PE008SLifetime Activities/Outdoor Adventures
Lifetime Activities/Outdoor Adventurespromotes participation in activities including: volleyball, softball, frisbee, golf, tennis, badminton, pickleball, bowling, shuffleboard, table tennis, horseshoes, and outdoor recreational pursuits.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness and either Sports and Fitness, Total Body Wellness, Beginning Weight Training, Advanced Weight Training, Basic Aquatics or Advanced Aquatics Skills and Lifeguard Training
This class may be taken two semesters for credit and additional times with teacher approval.
Demonstrate competency in activity specific motor skills.
Apply appropriate tactics and strategies in various activities.
Demonstrate healthy practices and behaviors.
Determine personal goals for level of participation and attainment/improvement.
Exhibit proper etiquette, respect for others and teamwork while engaging in physical activity.
Assess personal physical activity practices and behaviors.
Select and participatein physical activities that meet the need for self-expression, personal meaning, and enjoyment.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health4
174
Physical Education and Health
PE003STotal Body Wellness
Total Body Wellness focuses onenhancing cardiovascular fitness, improving core strength, toning muscles, improving flexibility, understanding and practicing personal nutritional needs, and caring for one’s social and emotional wellness.Activities may include mindfulness, yoga, walking for fitness, Pilates, movements for muscular development, studying nutritional and caloric needs, and team building activities. Students will design a fitness program including all components of health-related fitness.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness
Understand the basics of health-related fitness.
Create goals for improving and maintaining health.
Examine barriers to making a decision to stay physically active.
Analyze and compare the health benefits of a self-selected physical activity.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Semester
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit0.5Physical Education and Health5
175
Physical Education and Health
PE004SBasic Aquatic Skills
Basic Aquatic Skillsincludes aquatic activities (i.e. water polo, underwater hockey, canoeing), as well as skill acquisition forswimming and diving, basic water rescue, and survival techniques.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness
Students may take this course 1st semester if Personal Fitness & Wellness is on the student's second semester schedule.
Discuss the benefits of a physically active lifestyle as it relates to college or career readiness.
Evaluates risks and safety factors that might affect physical activity preferences throughout the life cycle.
Analyze the factors that influence opportunities to obtain safe, accessible and affordable products and services that support physical activity practices and behaviors for oneself and others.
Assess personal physical activity practices and behaviors.
Demonstrate competency and/or refines activity-specific movement skills.
Applies aquatic terminology.
Uses movement concepts and principles (e.g., force motion, rotation) to analyze and improve the performance of self and/or others in a selected skill.
Demonstrates competency in performing activities that contribute to improving each of the five components of health-related fitness.
Creates a practice plan to improve performance for a self-selected skill.
Apply appropriate tactics and strategies in various activities.
Evaluates - according to their benefits, social support network and participation requirements - activities that can be pursued in the local environment.
Applies best practices for participating safely in physical activity, exercise (e.g. injury prevention, proper alignment, hydration, use of equipment, implementation of rules.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health6
176
Physical Education and Health
PE001SAdvanced Aquatic Skills & Lifeguard Training
Advanced Aquatic Skills & Lifeguard Trainingis the American Red Cross Lifeguarding Today curriculum thatincludes the opportunity forlifeguard andCPR certification for the professional rescuer. Cardiovascular endurance and proper stroke technique is emphasized. To be eligible for Lifeguard Training, studentsmust be 15 years of age on or before the final scheduled class session.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness

Completion of Basic Aquatics with a grade of "C" or better or be able to perform course requirements with instructor approval
Students will be charged a fee by the Red Cross to complete their certification. This course may be taken two semesters for credit.
Identify and evaluate roles, characteristics, and responsibilities of a professional lifeguard.
Identify and analyze facility operations and aquatic injury prevention.
Identify and demonstrate proper surveillance techniques and emergency action plan.
Recognize water emergencies.
Develop an understanding of water rescues.
Demonstrate all the steps of a water rescue.
Prepare to provide care and assess a victim.
Recognize and respond to breathing emergencies.
Recognize and respond to cardiac emergencies.
Recognize and respond to first aid emergencies.
Care for head, neck or spinal injuries.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health7
177
Physical Education and Health
PE005SBeginning Strength Training
Beginning Strength Training teaches students how to actively participate in strength development as well as cardiovascular conditioning. The class examines aspects of body composition and nutrition to support being a healthy, active person.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness
Students may take 1st semester if Personal Fitness & Wellness is on the 2nd-semester schedule.

This class may be taken two semesters for credit and additional times with teacher approval.
Demonstrate competency and/or refine activity-specific movement skills.
Demonstrates competency in performing activities that contribute to improving components of health-related fitness.
Applies the terminology associated with exercise and participation in selected individual-performance activities.
Uses movement concepts and principles (e.g., force motion, rotation) to analyze and improve performanc
Designs a fitness program, including components of health-related fitness,
Evaluates the validity of claims made by commercial products and programs pertaining to fitness and a healthy, active lifestyle.
Summarize how a person can incorporate strength training into daily life (without relying on a structured exercise plan or special equipment).
Applies best practices for participating safely in weight training (e.g. injury prevention, proper alignment, hydration, use of equipment, implementation of rules.
Demonstrate effective peer resistance, negotiation, and collaboration skills to avoid being physically inactive.
Analyze the benefits weight training.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health8
178
Physical Education and Health
PE002SPE022SAdvanced Strength Training
Advanced Strength Training is designed for the experienced weightlifter. The class requiresdaily activeparticipation in a strength enhancing program (i.e., squats, cleans, presses, etc.) and speed development. Free weights will be used on an extensive basis to achieve stated goals. Program design, nutrition, and safety are also addressed.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness and Beginning Strength Training or teacher approval
This class may be taken two semesters for credit or more with teacher approval.
Demonstrate competency and/or refines activity-specific movement skills.
Demonstrates competency in performing activities that contribute to improving components of health-related fitness.
Applies the terminology associated with exercise and participation in selected individual-performance activities.
Uses movement concepts and principles (e.g., force motion, rotation) to analyze and improve performance.
Designs a fitness program, including components of health-related fitness,
Evaluates the validity of claims made by commercial products and programs pertaining to fitness and a healthy, active lifestyle.
Summarize how a person can incorporate strength training into daily life (without relying on a structured exercise plan or special equipment).
Exhibits proper etiquette and respect for others.
Applies best practices for participating safely in weight training (e.g. injury prevention, proper alignment, hydration, use of equipment, implementation of rules..
Demonstrate effective peer resistance, negotiation, and collaboration skills to avoid being physically inactive.
Demonstrate how to effectively ask for and effectively offer assistance.
Analyze the benefits of strength training.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health9
179
Physical Education and Health
PE027SPE Mentors / Moving Together
PE Mentors / Moving Together combines students of all abilities to participate in developmentally appropriate activities including lifetime activities, physical fitness, and sport. Students work together to increase competence and confidence in a variety of physical activities. Through ongoing leadership opportunities, members of this course are empowered to help create a more inclusive and accepting school environment for all students.
Successful completion of Personal Fitness & Wellness and either Sports and Fitness, Total Body Wellness, Beginning Weight Training, Advanced Weight Training, Basic Aquatics or Advanced Aquatics
Demonstrate competency in an activity specific skill.
Understand the rules of the game.
Communicate progress toward fitness and nutrition goals.
Exhibitproper etiquette,respect for others and teamwork while engaging in physical activity.
Demonstrate, encourage, and provide feedback.
Understand the strategies and tactics needed in order to help guide other students during the game/activity.
Help students work towards a goal.
Effectively communicate instructions.
Adapt an activity to meet the needs of students.
Solve problems and think critically.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Physical Education and Health10
180
Physical Education and Health
EL004SFirst Aid/Responding to Emergencies
First Aid/Responding to Emergencies is the American Red Cross, First Aid/Responding to Emergencies curriculum and focuses onbeginning first-aid care. The course includes an emphasis on the prevention of injuries and illness with a focus on personal safety. Students have the opportunity to earncertification in Responding to Emergencies, which includes First Aid and Community CPR, to act as the first link in the emergency medical system.Students are charged a fee by the Red Cross to complete their certification.
This course does not count as a Physical Education requirement credit.
Demonstrate how to respond to cardiac emergencies.
Demonstrate how to respond to breathing emergencies.
Understand disease transmission.
Demonstrate first aid techniques for bleeding control.
Apply first aid techniques for shock.
Identify and evaluate injuries.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Elective11
181
ScienceSC003SSC004SBiology
Biology is the study of the living world. Studentsengage in inquiry-based investigations to explore how organisms live and grow and how they interact with their environment. Students utilize science and engineering practices to study how characteristics of one generation are passed to the next and to explain how different species are related.
Completion of 8th Grade Science.
All Missouri high school students are required to take a Biology end-of-course exam prior to graduation.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
Investigate scientific questions and solve engineering problems using the science and engineering practices, appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms
Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.
Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations
Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.
Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy.
Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Science1
182
ScienceSC063SSC064SHonors BiologyYes
Honors Biology is an accelerated study of the living world. Students engage in inquiry-based investigations to explore how organisms live and grow and how they interact with their environment. Students utilize science and engineering practices to study how characteristics of one generation are passed to the next and to explain how different species are related.
Investigate scientific questions and solve engineering problems using the science and engineering practices, appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
All living organisms have shared characteristics.
Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.
Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Science2
183
ScienceSC019SSC020SPhysical Science
Physical Science is the study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and physics. Physical Science is a course that provides a foundation of the fundamental concepts in basic chemistry and physics. Emphasis will be placed on the study of matter and energy to explore real-world phenomena.
Students who have successfully completed Chemistry or Physics, or who are currently enrolled in these courses, may not take Physical Science.
Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.
Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a phase change depends upon the changes in total energy.
Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of matter.
Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare the structure and properties of substances.
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.
Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
Use mathematical representation to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.
Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motions of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative positions of particles (objects).
Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit, Credit Recover
1.0Science3
184
ScienceSC007SSC008SChemistry
Chemistry is the study of matter and chemical reactions between substances. Students engage in laboratory investigations to explore the structure, properties, and interactions of matter. Students utilize science and engineering practices to study how energy is transferred and conserved.
Completion of Biology or Honors Biology.
It is recommended that the student earned a grade of “C” or better in Algebra I to be prepared for the math required in Chemistry.
Plan and conduct investigations and design solutions to problems by using appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.
Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare the structure of substances at the bulk scale to infer the strength of electrical forces between particles
Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.
Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.
Develop a model to illustrate the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
Plan and conduct investigations and design solutions to problems by using appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
Credit Recover, First Time Credit
1.0Science4
185
ScienceSC100SSC101SHonors ChemistryYes
Honors Chemistry is comprehensive and accelerated study of matter and chemical reactions between substances. Students engage in laboratory investigations to explore the structure, properties, and interactions of matter. Students utilize science and engineering practices to study how energy is transferred and conserved. Students investigate the relationship between heat, enthalpy, and energy to calculate the energy associated with thermochemical equations.
Successful completion of Algebra 1.

A grade of “B” or better in Algebra 1 is recommended for success in Honors Chemistry.
Plan and conduct investigations and design solutions to problems by using appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.
Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.
Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.
Develop a model to illustrate the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare the structure of substances at the bulk scale to infer the strength of electrical forces between particles.
Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Science5
186
ScienceSC120SSC121SEnvironmental Science
Environmental Science emphasizes the relationship of plants and animals to each other and to their environment. Students use techniques of the naturalist and field biologist to study environmental problems. Students will investigate issues related to how the availability and use of natural resources influence human activity. They will collect, observe, and census information to design or refine solutions to complex real-world problems. Evaluation of competing design solutions to real-world problems based on scientific ideas and principles and empirical evidence will occur regularly. They will also analyze complex real-world problems by specifying criteria and constraints for successful solutions.
Successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology.
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources that influence human activity.
Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations and biodiversity.
Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
Evaluate the evidence to supporting claims that changes in the environmental conditions may result in: 1)increases in the number of individuals of some species; 2) the emergence of new species over time; 3) the extinction of other species.
Investigate scientific questions and solve engineering problems using the science and engineering practices, appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth’s systems result in changes in climate.
Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous coevolution of Earth’s systems and life on Earth.
Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.
Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.
Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth systems.
Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit, Credit Recover
1.0Science6
187
ScienceSC011SSC012SGeoscience
Geoscience involves the study of geologic principles which act upon the Earth to produce our physical world. Students investigate rocks and minerals, fossils, astronomy, and meteorology through the use of science and engineering practices.
Passing grade in Biology or Honors Biology, and Physical Science or Chemistry or Honors Chemistry.
This course may be available for college credit. Please see the Geoscience teacher for details.
Analyze geoscience data to make the claim that one change to Earth's surface can create feedback that causes changes to other Earth systems.
Develop a model based on evidence of Earth’s interior to describe the cycling of matter by thermal convection.
Investigate scientific questions and solve engineering problems using the science and engineering practices, appropriate safety guidelines, tools, and lab techniques.
Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on Earth materials and surface processes.
Evaluate evidence of the past and current movements of continental and oceanic crust and the theory of plate tectonics to explain the ages of crustal rocks.
Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient Earth materials, meteorites, and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of Earth’s formation and early history.
Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe.
Communicate scientific ideas about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements.
Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.
Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth’s systems result in changes in climate.
Analyze atmospheric data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate and atmospheric patterns.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Science7
188
ScienceSC105SSC106SAuthentic Applications of Biochemistry
Authentic Applications of Biochemistry allows students to engage in science and engineering practices that enable them to apply foundational concepts in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to real‐world scenarios and laboratory investigations.
Successful completion of Biology and one additional year-long science course.
Maintain a portfolio of laboratory techniques and reports to demonstrate content mastery and communication skills.
Ask questions that arise from careful observation of phenomena, or unexpected results, to clarify and or seek additional information.
Plan and conduct investigations to produce data to serve as evidence and determine accuracy of data needed to produce reliable measurements.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Science8
189
ScienceSC013SSC014SHuman Anatomy and Physiology
Human Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the physical and chemical processes of the human body. Students study how the structures of the human body relate to the functions of interacting body systems. Students examine the human body as a living, functioning, homeostatic organism but they also explore cause and effect relationships to problem solve why a bodily process might not be functioning as it should.
Successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology.
It is recommended students earn a grade of “C” or better in Biology to be successful in Human Anatomy and Physiology.

10th grade students may enroll in Human Anatomy and Physiology with concurrent enrollment in Physical Science, Chemistry, or Honors Chemistry.
Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
Use arguments supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in growth, development and repair of the human body.
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence homeostasis in the human body and how in certain situations the body works to maintain homeostasis or to restore stability.
Construct and revise explanations of scientific processes based upon how biochemistry helps to regulate processes within the human body on a molecular level.
Plan and conduct an investigation or develop a model to illustrate how food molecules are broken down chemically and mechanically through digestion to provide raw materials and energy for bodily functions.
Gather and synthesize information that demojavascript:;nstrates sensory receptors respond to stimuli by sending messages to the brain for immediate behavior (i.e., muscle contraction for movement) or storage as memories.
Use or develop a model of the structures of the central nervous system that are responsible for the various functions of the body.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12Year
Traditional Seated, Online - Off Campus, Online - On Campus
First Time Credit1.0Science9
190
ScienceSC104SForensic Science
Forensic Science is an introductory study in forensics that applies concepts from life, Earth, and physical sciences. Studentslearn and apply scientific investigative techniques in body decomposition and entomology, hair and fiber analysis, fingerprinting, blood spatter, and DNA evidence.
Successful completion of Biology and one additional science course.
Investigate crime scenes carefully, systematically, and scientifically by asking questions that arise from careful observation of evidence to clarify and/or seek additional information.
Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning that the human body, decomposition, and insect populations can be used to establish cause, manner, mechanism and time of death.
Analyze hair and fiber evidence using various scientific techniques in order to obtain information about a crime
Process and analyze the basic properties of fingerprints using various techniques to identify or exclude individuals involved in a crime.
Analyze properties of blood and modeled blood spatter patterns to draw conclusions about the events at a crime scene.
Analyze mathematical relationships to draw conclusions.
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure and functions of DNA relate to processing forensic evidence.
Investigate how DNA evidence is prepared, evaluated and analyzed using various techniques so that individuals can be placed or excluded from the scene of a crime.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12SemesterTraditional Seated0.5Science10
191
ScienceSC039SSC040SAP Physics 1YesYes
AP Physics 1 is equivalent to the first semester of an introductory, algebra‐based college physics course. Content focuses on the topics of forces, motion, energy, momentum, waves and electrical circuits.
Successful completion of Honors Geometry or Algebra 2.

Concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra 2 or Trigonometry/Algebra 3.
To be successful in AP Physics 1, it is important that students can apply basic trigonometric functions.
Engage in inquiry-based investigations that require application of scientific practices to study concepts thoroughly for deeper understanding.
Complete laboratory work that focuses on experimental design and analysis of data.
Further develop skills such as reading, writing of short answers/essays, and solving numerical problems to promote critical thinking.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
10, 11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP11
192
ScienceSC041SSC042SAP Physics 2YesYes
AP Physics 2 is equivalent to the second semester of an introductory, algebra‐based college physics course. Content includes an in‐depth study of fluids, thermodynamics with kinetic theory, electrostatics, electrical circuits with capacitors, magnetic fields, electromagnetism, physical and geometric optics as well as quantum, atomic and nuclear physics.
Successful completion of AP Physics 1, Honors Algebra 2 or Trigonometry/Algebra 3, and Precalculus.

Students may be concurrently enrolled in Precalculus.
Engage in inquiry-based investigations that require application of scientific practices to study concepts thoroughly for deeper understanding.
Laboratory work that focuses on experimental design and analysis of data.
Further develop skills such as reading, writing of short answers/essays, and solving numerical problems to promote critical thinking.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP12
193
ScienceSC031SSC032SAP Advanced PhysicsYesYes
AP Advanced Physics is designed for students who are planning to specialize or major in physics or engineering. The Mechanics portion of the course is intended to be the equivalent of a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course and the Electricity and Magnetism components are the equivalent of another one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course. Content focuses on the topics of kinematics; work, energy and power; Newton's Laws of Motion; systems of particles and linear momentum, circular motion and rotation; oscillations and gravitation as well as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism.
Successful completion of AP Physics 1 and Calculus or concurrent enrollment in Calculus.
It is recommended that students earn a grade of “C” or better in AP Physics 1 and Calculus to be adequately prepared for AP Advanced Physics.
Engage in inquiry-based investigations that require the application of scientific practices to study concepts thoroughly for deeper understanding.
Laboratory work that focuses on experimental design and analysis of data.
Apply calculus-based mathematics to physics topics.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP13
194
ScienceSC033SSC034SAP BiologyYesYes
AP Biology is equivalent to an introductory college‐level biology course. Content focuses on the topics of evolution, cellular processes (energy and communication), genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.
Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
It is recommended that students earn a grade of “C” or better in Biology and Chemistry to be prepared for AP Biology.
Engage in inquiry-based investigations that require the application of scientific practices to study biological concepts.
Laboratory work that focuses on quantitative skills and application of mathematical methods.
Apply mathematical thinking and statistical analysis to science and engineering questions and problems.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP14
195
ScienceSC035SSC036SAP ChemistryYesYes
AP Chemistry is a course designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college chemistry course and provides students with the foundations for advanced chemistry courses. Content focuses on the topics of atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.
Successful completion of Chemistry and Algebra 2.
A grade of "B" or better in Chemistry and a "C" or better in Honors Chemistry is recommended to be prepared for AP Chemistry.

A grade of "C" or better in Algebra 2 is also recommended.
Engage in inquiry-based investigations that require the application of scientific practices.
Laboratory work that focuses on experimental design and analysis of data.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP15
196
ScienceSC102SSC103SAP Environmental ScienceYesYes
The AP Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one‐semester, introductory college course in environmental science. This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Topics of study include: Earth systems and resources, the living world, population, land and water use, energy resources and consumption, pollution and global change.
Successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology.

It is recommended that the student should have earned a grade of "B" or better in both Chemistry and Algebra 2 to prepare for this course.
Engage in inquiry-based experimentation and field investigations for a deeper understanding of content.
Identify and analyze environmental issues, both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated and examine alternative solutions for resolving/preventing the issue.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0ScienceYesAP16
197
ScienceSC055SSC056SConcepts of Semi-Micro Qualitative Analysis & Organic ChemistryYes
Concepts of Semi-Micro Qualitative Analysis & Organic Chemistry is a second-year chemistry course composed of two distinct semesters. The first semester addresses the concepts of semi-micro analysis, which is oriented toward laboratory analysis of solutions. The second semester focuses on topics in organic chemistry, which is the study of Carbon compounds (alcohols, hydrocarbons, polymers, etc.) and their relationship to biochemical structures.
Successful completion of Chemistry.

Engage in experimental design by planning and carrying out investigations individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence.
Select appropriate tools to collect, record, analyze, and evaluate data.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
11, 12YearTraditional Seated1.0Science17
198
ScienceSC049SSC050SScience Research 1 [AP Seminar]Yes
Science Research 1 [AP Seminar] is the first course of a three-year program where students explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing multiple perspectives through a science research lens. Students learn to investigate a problem or issue, analyze arguments, compare different perspectives, synthesize information from multiple sources, and work alone and in a group to communicate their ideas in both written and multimedia presentations. Students will plan and carry out investigations and gain knowledge in both technical writing, scientific argumentation, and the construction of scientific explanations. They will learn to make claims supported by evidence through models, data, research, and additional sources. As they work, they will determine the validity of data through data analysis and an introduction to statistical analysis and computational thinking for larger datasets in science. They will obtain, evaluate, and communicate claims, methods, and designs and make connections with community volunteer programs to further their study of research.
Application and concurrent enrollment in a science course. Seniors who have fulfilled their science credit graduation requirement are not required to be concurrently enrolled in a science course.

This course fulfills one of the three components for earning an AP Capstone Diploma through the College Board. Please see the Science Research 1 [AP Seminar] teacher for more details.
Ask and refine questions that can be empirically tested and that lead to descriptions and explanations of how the natural and designed world(s) work.
Engage in argument using sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s) in order to synthesize scientific explanations and develop solutions to problems.
Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information from multiple sources in order to evaluate the merit and validity of claims, methods and designs.
Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade -offs that account for a range of constraints.
Ask and refine questions that can be empirically tested and that lead to descriptions and explanations of how the natural and designed world(s) work.
Plan and carry out investigations in the field or laboratory, working collaboratively as well as individually, to provide evidence for and to test conceptual, mathematical, physical and empirical models.
Analyze and interpret data, introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models in order to identify the significant features and patterns in the data.
Eureka High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood Summit High School
09, 10, 11, 12
YearTraditional Seated1.0Science18
199
ScienceSC057SSC058SScience Research 2 [AP Research]Yes
Science Research 2 [AP Research] is the second course of a three-year program where students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest through a science research lens. Students design, plan and implement a yearlong investigation to address a research question. Through this process, they further the skills they acquired in the Science Research 1 [AP Seminar] course. Students reflect on t